War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0505 Chapter XLIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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the Chucky. The captain is a very sensible and intelligent man. This agrees with the tendency of all the information I receive, and I have little doubt of it.

There is good reason to believe also that a considerable infantry force are in intrenchments at Panther Springs, beyond Mossy Creek, 7 or 8 miles.

Yours, respectfully,

S. D. STURGIS,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Cavalry.

HEADQUARTERS,

Dr. Peck's, December 26, 1863-11 a. m.

General ELLIOTT:

I have just received a message from one of Colonel McCook's staff to the effect that a considerable body of the enemy's cavalry has got around your left flank, and was moving up toward Mossy Creek. I presume you will be able to check them without Colonel Garrard. Please look out for their flank moves, and rather fall back slowly than risk being turned, as from information I have I will fall back anyway rather than advance, unless I received orders from Foster to the contrary. There is no doubt but Longstreet's infantry is near Morristown, I think.

S. D. STURGIS,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY CORPS,

Dr. Peck's, December 26, 1863-1 p. m.

General ELLIOTT:

GENERAL: Yours of 12.40 is received. I feel easier now that you have covered the roads from Dyer's Ferry and from Chucky Bend by Colonel McCook's command. You will perceive by dispatches I sent you from Flat Gap that the enemy has not advanced in that direction, so that it will not be necessary for you to fall back any father at present as a simple precaution. Please give me some particulars of the firing. The last few guns (some ten minutes since) appeared to be farther round on your right than the first firing. Please keep my hasty notes.

Yours,&c.,

S. D. STURGIS,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY CORPS,

Dr. Peck's, December 26, 1863-2 p. m.

General ELLIOTT:

I am perfectly convinced of the existence of a large infantry force at Morristown and of the desire of the enemy to entire us in that direction. as it would not, therefore, be prudent for us to advance (especially while their cavalry is at Dandridge), and as there are no special reasons for our remaining in the positions our troops now