War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0496 KY., SW. VA., Tennessee, MISS., N. ALA., AND N. GA.

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[CHAP. XLIII.

at whose house the party was to be given, and told her the entertainment could not be allowed. That I would do everything for the prisoners that humanity and the laws of civilized warfare dictated, but I would not permit them to be feted when our men were being literally starved to death in Richmond.

Two days after I heard the reason why I would not allow the party to come off was because the Vicksburg ladies would not go to Federal parties with Federal officers-a good reason, truly.

Please give my kindest regards to General Halleck, Colonel Thom, and others of my acquaintance.

Sincerely, your friend,

JAS. B. McPHERSON,

Major-General.

MOUND CITY, ILLINOIS,

December 25, 1863.

Major-General GRANT:

The gun-boat you mentioned was ordered to proceed yesterday with the transport to Savannah. Captain Shirk is at Savannah.

D. D. PORTER,

Rear-Admiral.

WAR DEPARTMENT, December 26, 1863-4.40 p.m.

Brigadier-General MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General, Nashville and Chattanooga:

The operations of the active armies in the West being now suspended, your presence here will, in my judgment, be more advantageous to the service than any personal duty elsewhere. You will, therefore, return immediately to Washington, and take charge of your bureau. You will acknowledge the receipt of this telegram.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

WASHINGTON, D. C.,

December 26, 1863.

Major-General GRANT,

Nashville:

GENERAL: Your letter of the 17th is just received. The views which you express in that letter agree essentially with those expressed in my telegrams sent to you since its date. The force to be retained in East Tennessee must, of course, be limited by your means of supplying it. I only with to convey to you the anxiety of the President that the enemy should, if possible, be prevented from laving waste that country and gathering up its products for its own subsistence during the winter. As the roads from Kentucky become difficult or impassable over the mountains during the winter, I presume that the smaller rations, clothing, and ammunition for Foster's army must go by Chattanooga. Cattle and hogs may be driven over