War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0487 Chapter XLIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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[at] Red Bone Church, east of Warrenton. You will, therefore, send two regiments of infantry to that post as soon as possible under the command of a good colonel, who will on his arrival take command of all the forces at the post. There is good camping-ground in the vicinity, and should it be found necessary to keep the force there for a few days the camp and garrison equipage can be sent down. A guide will be furnished from headquarters to conduct the troops.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. B. McPHERSON,

Major-General.

CINCINNATI, OHIO, December 24, 1863.

Ho. EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Our road can transport, with two days' notice in advance, 8,000 men per day. They will have to take other cars at Lexington for Louisville. Louisville and Nashville same gauge as ours. We cannot concentrate our cars at Louisville owing to difference of gauge between Louisville and Lexington. Time from Covington to Louisville twelve hours.

R. P. BOWLER,

President.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Numbers 296.

Chattanooga, Tennessee, December 25, 1863.

It is ordered that a national cemetery be founded at this place in commemoration of the battles of Chattanooga, fought November 23, 24, 25, 26, and 27, and to provide a proper resting-place for the remains of the brave men who fell upon the fields fought over upon those days, and for the remains of such as may hereafter give up their lives in this region in defending their country against treason and rebellion.

The ground selected for the cemetery is the hill lying beyond the Western and Atlantic Railroad, in a southeasterly direction from the town.

It is proposed to erect a monument upon the summit of the hills, of such materials as are to be obtained in this vicinity, which, like all the work the cemetery, shall be exclusively done by the troops of the Army of the Cumberland.

Plans for the monument are invited to be sent in to these headquarters.

When the ground is prepared notice will be given, and all interments of soldiers will thereafter be made in the cemetery, and all now buried in and around the town removed to that place.

By command of Major General General George H. Thomas:

WM. D. WHIPPLE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.