War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0387 Chapter XLIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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the field, at this time, depends the existence or non-existence of the corps, and only for this reason have I taken the liberty to ask that you will address the General-in-Chief upon this subject. Will you please to direct that I be furnished with a copy of your letter.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. H. HOWARD,

Captain, Signal Corps, U. S. Army and Chief Signal Officer

WASHINGTON, December 12, 1863-3.22 p.m.

Major-General Palmer's resignation has not been accepted, and he is still the commander of the Fourteenth Army Corps. The order of the Adjutant-General accepting his resignation was issued by mistake for some other officer's and is revoked. Immediately notify General Palmer of this.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Chattanooga, December 12, 1863.

Brigadier-General CROOK,

Commanding Second Cavalry Division:

SIR: It is intended to cross your division over the Tennessee River to unite with the cavalry in West Tennessee, in movements against the rebel cavalry in North Alabama and Mississippi. You will therefore prepare your command immediately for such movement. Let your horses be shod, rested, and recruited. If you lack ammunition instruct your ordnance officer to draw it at once. I will be in Nashville, and will aid you all that I can in getting anything that you may need. What force in your judgment should be left to watch the crossings of the Tennessee River, and at what point should such force be stationed? Will not the mounted men of Sherman's command be sufficient for this duty? What force can you have inn readiness for the movement,say in two weeks from the present? The portions of your division that are now detached can be returned to duty with you, and their places supplied from the First Division. Send me a copy of your report to Nashville, that I may be informed of the position and strength of the brigades and regiments of your command, and write stating your condition and wants fully.

Very respectfully,

W. S. SMITH,

Brigadier-General, Chief of Cavalry.

CHATTANOOGA, December 12, 1863.

Major General J. G. FOSTER

Knoxville, Tennessee:

Drive Longstreet to the farthest point east you can. Retain Granger as long as may be necessary.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.