War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0350 KY., SW.,VA., Tennessee, MISS., N.ALA., AND N.GA Chapter XLIII.

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emy have not got army enough to resist the army I can take. There is no necessity for me enlarging upon this, because I could say nothing in favor of it that will not suggest itself to you. Hoping an early reply by telegraph, this is respectfully, submitted.

I am, general, &c.,

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General

CINCINNATI, December 7, 1863.

(Received 2.10 p.m.)

Lieutenant Colonel J. A. HARDIE:

The following is copy of General Foster's telegram:

Captain W. P. ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

Issue an order for all quartermasters and commissaries at Lexington and Louisville and north of the Ohio River, excepting those on duty by special orders, to report to the chiefs of the respective departments for duty in the field. Please send me a statement of all the six-months regiments in this department,and the time of expiration of their enlistment. Order all officers to return to their commands unless on special duty by order of the department.

EDWARD E. POTTER,

Chief of Staff.

T. SWORDS,

Assistant Quartermaster-General.

WASHINGTON, D., C.,

December 7, 1863-1.55 p.m.

Major-General FOSTER,

East Tennessee:

Quartermasters and commissaries assigned to depots for the supply of several departments or armies can be removed only by the Secretary of War or the chief of their corps. Adjutant and inspector-generals and other staff officers belonging exclusively to your command are subject to your orders.

I will write to you more particularly in regard to your telegram to the Secretary of War.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

Washington, December 7, 1863.

Major General J. G. FOSTER,

Commanding Department of the Ohio, Tazewell, Tennessee:

GENERAL: The Secretary of War has just shown me your telegram to him in regard to quartermasters and commissaries. I have not seen your order, but am informed that it includes the quartermasters and commissaries assigned by the heads of their corps to the great depots at Louisville and Cincinnati, established for the supply of several armies and departments. Any sudden change of this kind would seriously interfere with the supplies not only for your department, but also for those of General Thomas, Sherman, and Schofield.