War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0325 Chapter XLIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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You will also send 100 toward Salem and Holly Springs, to return via La Fayette or Moscow, and another 100 southwest toward Early Grove and Mount Pleasant. The object is to obtain information of the whereabouts and movements of the enemy, and particularly whether any force of infantry is near us. Should any considerable force be encountered, instruct the officer to watch them and send word immediately back.

By order of Brigadier General B. H. Grierson:

S. L. WOODWARD,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

MEMPHIS, December 3, 1863.

General GRIERSON:

GENERAL: If Forrest has gone north it is for the purpose of organizing the bands above. It will not require a very strong force to follow him up. The main attention should be given to the force south of you until it is ascertained that there is no heavy force of infantry south. Fit your cavalry up as fully as possible. Report losses and captures.

S. A. HURLBUT,

Major-General.

LA GRANGE, December 3, 1863.

Major-General HURLBUT:

Your dispatch received. Hatch and his command are much fatigued and will lose no time by resting here to-night. Have ordered him to be ready to move at daylight to-morrow. Information of Forrest going north is rather indefinite. Will communicate with Mizner as soon as possible. I presume he is at Pocahontas. Can order him to send the Seventh Kansas to join Hatch at Bolivar, and with rest of his command look well south if you think best; this will give Hatch about 1,300 men. Most of the enemy have gone south, and both Tuttle and Hatch think they may move west and strike the road between here and Memphis, probably La Fayette or Collierville. I have ordered patrols south from these points.

B. H. GRIERSON,

Brigadier-General.

COLUMBIA, December 3, 1863.

Major-General GRANT:

Telegram received directing me to put my force to building trestle railroad bridge over Duck River and to obey instructions from Brigadier-General Dodge in this matter. My force is only 300 men, having yesterday relieved pioneers at Smith's Station, and having two companies at Franklin, daily details to be deducted. I can work 50 soldiers and 100 negroes. I have plenty of good mechanics and 2 officers practical engineers. I shall send to Nashville at once for axes and tools, and push the work with all possible dispatch.

HENRY R. MIZNER,

Colonel Fourteenth Michigan Infantry.