War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0272 KY.,SW.VA.,Tennessee,MISS.,N.ALA.,AND N.GA. Chapter XLIII.

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Burnside thought he could hold out six or eight days from the time Crawford left. A negro, who left the rebel camp yesterday, reports that Wheeler's cavalry went down toward Kingston early in the week, and attacked Byrd, and was repulsed. Colonel Crawford says that General Burnside thinks that from rebel movements they are expecting re-enforcement. They do not intend to burn the town, but to reduce it by starving the garrison.

O. B. WILLCOX,

Brigadier-General.

CUMBERLAND GAP, November 28, 1863-8 p.m.

General FOSTER:

I have just received information that General Ransom was at Kingston night before last, with 5,000 or 6,000 infantry, on his way to Knoxville. The cavalry that was above have already passed down. At the suggestion of General Grant, I was preparing for a move with my mounted force toward Abingdon and to salt-works when I heard from General Burnside, and pressed to place my infantry within striking distance of Cumberland Gap and send the cavalry down and try to harass the enemy's left and rear. In pursuance of this object a brigade of cavalry crossed Clinch River this morning toward Knoxville. I fear that they will be able to effect but little unless Grant's great victory should have compelled Longstreet to raise the siege, of which I see no signs as yet.

O. B. WILLCOX,

Brigadier-General.

J. G. FOSTER,

Major-General.

BARBOURSVILLE, KY., November 29, 1863-9.30 p.m (Received 10.55 p.m.)

Major-General HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

The matter of supplies is of so much importance that preparations must be at once made to meet the emergency that will arise this winter. The roads are very bad, and will soon become impassable for wagons, although I have directed repairs to be commenced at once. It will be necessary to provide large pack trains, and to this end I have directed Captain Dickerson to procure all the pack-saddles possible, and an additional number of mules suitable for this service. I have to request that you give the necessary orders to the Quartermaster's Department to have the requisition of Captain Dickerson for this object filled as soon as possible, and every assistance furnished in the way of packers, &c.

J. G. FOSTER,

Major-General.

BARBOURSVILLE, KY., November 29, 1863. (Received 4 a.m., 30th.)

Major-General HALLECK:

The following dispatch is just received from General Willcox:

CUMBERLAND GAP, November 29, 1863-7.15 p.m.

Major-General FOSTER:

My scouts in the direction of Knoxville report that cannonading has been heard at the rate of forty shots per minute from 12 o'clock last night to 10 o'clock this morning. Heretofore the firing has been slow and seldom, so that I suppose Longstreet must have his batteries in position, and is now trying to bring things to a rapid close.

O. B. WILLCOX.

J. G. FOSTER,

Major-General.