War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0249 Chapter XLIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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who accompanied these commands in their recent stealing raids. The officers and men composing the expedition must respect and protect the rights of inoffensive citizens.

Very respectfully, yours, &c.,

HOBSON,

Brigadier-General.

HDQRS. DIST. OF SOUTHERN CENTRAL KENTUCKY,

Munfordville, Ky., November 25, 1863.

Colonel WEATHERFORD,

Commanding U. S. Forces, Columbia, Ky.:

COLONEL: Send immediately 300 men of your command, under competent officers, via Marrowbone Store, to Cumberland River, with instructions to scout the country from that point up the Cumberland to Creelsborough. They will arrest all Federal deserters and kill as many armed rebels as possible. The expedition must be provided with three days' rations in haversacks. You will also warn the officers and men composing the command that the right of unoffending citizens must be protected. You will also send one full company through Russell County fully equipped and furnished with three days' rations.

Very respectfully,

HOBSON,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS, Louisville, November 25, 1863.

Major-General GRANT:

I have sent Sixth Indiana Cavalry as escort for Major-General Foster to Cumberland Gap. I have ordered Fifty-first New York, little over 200 strong, and one company of Fourteenth Kentucky Cavalry to London and two companies of Fourteenth Kentucky Cavalry to Barboursville.

I have sent Ninety-first Indiana to Camp Nelson, and can send that regiment or Forty-seventh Kentucky to Richmond or Big Hill with part of Fortieth Kentucky Mounted. I fear to withdraw too much of force line of Louisville and Nashville Railroad. I have asked General Willcox to advise freely, as he knows position of enemy.

I will see any orders you give executed. The Seventh Indiana Cavalry is still at Indianapolis. Could it be sent here temporarily for duty?

J. T. BOYLE,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS SIXTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Memphis, Tennessee, November 25, 1863.

JEPTHA FOWLKES, Esq.:

As the author of an article in the Bulletin over the signature of "X" you have published charges against the Treasury officers, which they pronounce unfounded and malicious. These officers