War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0245 Chapter XLIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS SIXTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Memphis, Tennessee, November 24, 1863.

EDITORS BULLETIN,

Memphis, Tennessee:

You published in your issue of yesterday an article, over the signature of "X," which is exceedingly improper. You have been notified that it is not your province to puff officers in their official conduct. The acts of military officers are subject to the review of their superiors, and either praise or blame must come from them. You will hereafter absolutely refuse admittance to your columns to any articles of similar nature while I have the honor to command here.

S. A. HURLBUT,

Major-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. SIXTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

No. 296. Memphis, Tennessee, November 24, 1863.

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V. Colonel W. H. Morgan will move his brigade to Moscow and thence to Somerville with ten days' rations and 60 rounds of ammunition. He will establish his headquarters at Somerville and protect with his force the working parties engaged in removing the iron and chairs from the Somerville branch. In the discharge of this duty he will use all possible exertion to suppress guerrillas; he will take from the inhabitants all available horses and good mules, and as far as possible support and forage his command from the country. To men who claim to be loyal he will cause vouchers to be given, "not transferable and payable at the end of the war on proof of loyalty." From disloyal persons or those who are shown to have harbored guerrillas, necessary supplies, horses, and mules will be taken, giving receipts as disloyal persons.

Nothing, however, will be allowed to be taken for private use or as pillage, but everything of that nature will be suppressed by summary trial and punishment.

2. Colonel Hatch, commanding cavalry brigade, will leave one regiment at La Grange and one battalion at Memphis, and such camp and picket guards as are necessary, and will advance the others north of the railroad in separate columns, sweeping the country south of the Hatchie and reassembling at Somerville on the infantry.

3. All the spare cavalry from the brigade command by Colonel Mizner will be assembled and move south of the railroad in force, driving in all parties of the enemy and pushing south as far as may be safe without risking the command. This movement must be sharp and active, and Colonel Mizner will be charged with the execution of the same.

4. The cavalry expedition will supply themselves from the country through which they pass; mills where guerrillas assemble will be burned,horses and mules available for service brought in, and receipts given for property taken, "not transferable, payable at the end of the war on proof of loyalty."

5. The absolute destruction of the guerrillas bands north of the railroad in contemplated by this movements, and Colonel Hatch will see to it that no misjudged clemency prevents such course and will receive further orders upon his report from Somerville.