War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0207 Chapter XLIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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in the assault, our men reserving their until close upon them. Our men fought well and are still determined. Wheeler's whole corps and one division of Longstreet's is reported this side of town. My cavalry have been unable to effect communication with General Burnside. Firing has been heard at Knoxville to-day, but not as heavy as yesterday. The enemy have blockaded the roads approaching from the north.

O. B. WILLCOX,

Brigadier-General.

CHATTANOOGA, November 20, 1863.

Brig. General O. B. WILLCOX,

Bean's Station, E. Tennessee:

If you receive no further instructions from General Burnside, follow those he has given you. Retreat should not be allowed cut off, but can you not concentrate your forces and raise the siege at Knoxville? This I know would close the route to Cumberland Gap for us, and would probably not compensate unless entirely successful in expelling Longstreet.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

CHATTANOOGA, November 20, 1863.

Brig. General O. B. WILLCOX,

Bean's Station, E. Tennessee:

If you can communicate with General Burnside, say to him that our attack on Bragg will commence in the morning. If successful, such a move will be made as I think will relieve East Tennessee, if he can hold out. Longstreet passing through our lines to Kentucky need not cause alarm. He would find the country so bare that he would lose his transportation and artillery before reaching Kentucky, and would meet such a force before he got through that he could not return.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

FORT SANDERS, November 20, 1863-11.20 a.m.

Brigadier-General POTTER:

Report from Colonel Morrison:

Captain HICKS,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

In compliance with instructions I have the honor to report that my picket-line is within 150 yards of the enemy on my right; there is no enemy in front of me on the left. My present line is parallel with that of the enemy in front of the fort. I consider it a better position than the one previously held. It would be impossible for me to advance my line farther. Yesterday afternoon my old advance line was not held by either party, but was occupied by the enemy about 9 o'clock last night, who moved down in heavy force from the position I now hold on the ridge. I can observe every movement of the enemy in front of the fort in daylight; my vedettes