War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0181 Chapter XLIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

which have been occupied to cover and protect the plantations along the river, and I do not desire to abandon them unless the emergency should be very great. If, however, anything like 16,000 men should be marching against you,it would be best to abandon the posts of Milliken's Bend and Goodrich's Landing temporarily, as I could not send men enough from here to meet such a force without stripping the post entirely.

Keep me advised by telegraph of everything important which you may hear. The three boats you mention as having stopped, together with the Era, which goes up immediately, will carry your command I presume. There is no gun-boats here, but there is one, I understand at Milliken's Bend, and another in the vicinity of Lake Providence, besides the one at your place.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. B. McPHERSON,

Major-General.

CHATTANOOGA, November 18, 1863-9 p.m.

(Received 5.30 a.m., 19th.)

Maj. General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

Dispatches from Burnside received to 10 p.m. yesterday. Troops had got back to Knoxville. Sherman's advance reached Lookout Valley

to-day. Movement will progress; threaten enemy's left flank until forces can be got up and thrown across the river to attack their right flank and Missionary Ridge. A battle or a falling back of the enemy is inevitable by Saturday at farthest. Burnside speaks hopefully.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, November 18, 1863-8.40 p.m.

His Excellency the PRESIDENT,

Gettysburg, Pa.:

Dispatch from Burnside, at Knoxville, dated 10 o'clock last night. His troops, batteries, and trains had all arrived, and his position strengthened. The enemy made no demonstration during the day; some cavalry skirmishing on the Kingston road. The enemy appear to be holding back for some reason. Burnside expresses confidence in the strength of his position. Nothing from Chattanooga or any other place sine your departure. On inquiry Mrs. Lincoln informs me that your son is better this evening.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT, November 18, 1863-10 p.m.

To the PRESIDENT,

Gettysburg, Pa.:

Another dispatch from Burnside just received, dated to-day, but he hour not mentioned. Heavy skirmishing all day, chiefly on the