War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0174 KY.,SW.VA.,Tennessee,MISS.,N.ALA., AND N.GA. Chapter XLIII.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, November 17, 1863-2.15 p.m.

Brig. General M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General, Bridgeport, Tennessee:

Your telegram of yesterday's date has been received. You will accept my thanks for the attention. I would be glad to have as frequent and full reports from you as to the state of affairs in Tennessee as you have leisure to give me. Let me add that your distinguished services in that important field are fully appreciated, and entitle you to the thanks of this Department, which are cordially given. Your family, I am informed by Mrs. Meigs, are well.

EDWIN M. STATION,

Secretary of War.

NASHVILLE, November 17, 1863.

Maj. General U. S. GRANT:

General Burnside telegraphs me as follows from Knoxville: "Do not want the clothing. I cannot send to meet the trains at present." The first hundred wagons were to have started to-morrow. The rations ordered to Big South Fork still here. Swelling rise in river. Would it not be best for them to go to Celina, south of Obey's River, and thence by Jamestown and Montgomery? Better road and saves 150 miles difficult transportation by river.

J. L. DONALDSON,

Chief Quartermaster.

CHATTANOOGA, November 17, 1863.

Colonel J. J. DONALDSON, Chief Quartermaster, Nashville:

General Burnside is now engaged with the enemy. You need not start the clothing for him until the results is known and further orders are received from here.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH AND TWELFTH CORPS, Lookout Valley, Tennessee, November 17, 1863.

Lieutenant-Colonel GODDARD,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: Four prisoners from the First Regiment just in confirm the report which reached me day before yesterday that the Tennessee brigade has been relieved on the top of Lookout Mountain by Stevenson's division, made up principally of paroled prisoners from Vicksburg. The reason assigned for this change is that the rebel authorities were afraid to instruct the defense of Lookout Mountain to Tennessee regiments, owing to the defection known to exist among them. The latter are now encamped between Lookout and Missionary Mountains. They escaped from there last night. Can obtain no reliable information of any other movements of the enemy. No changes are visible in the enemy's new work on the north slope of Lookout.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major-General, Commanding.