War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0156 KY.,SW.VA.,Tennessee,MISS.,N.ALA.,, AND N.GA. Chapter XLIII.

Search Civil War Official Records

could hear or see nothing indicating a movement. I am of opinion that the enemy can throw into Lookout Valley over the north point of the mountain about 8,000 infantry an hour; and if done at night, or on a foggy morning, without being observed by our forces stationed on the opposite side of the river. For this reason, if the best interest of the service will admit of it, I request that the First Division of the Twelfth Corps may be ordered to join me. Deserters and refugees continue to arrive; of the former I should think about a dozen per day. I sent six families yesterday to Kelley's Ferry to take passage to Nashville or Murfreesborough. A refugee just in from Lookout Mountain reports that the rebels closed up Nickajack pass night before last by felling trees.

Very respectfully,

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major-General, Commanding.

WASHINGTON, November 15, 1863-1 p.m.

Major-General BURNSIDE,

Knoxville, Tennessee:

General Meade is confident that no re-enforce have gone from Lee to Jones, in the Virginia Valley. Jones cannot seriously threaten you on that side. Grant will move a large force on Longstreet's rear. I you hold him in check for only a few days, he will be obliged to fall back. You must not abandon your position in Tennessee, but keep as near to Thomas as possible.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

CHATTANOOGA, November 15, 1863.

Major-General BURNSIDE:

Boats have been lying at Nashville loaded with rations to take to Big South Fork ever since you asked to have them sent there waiting for convoy. I had to send all the way to Cairo before orders for gun-boats could be got; they have now arrived at Nashville, and will go up by the first rise. Colonel Donaldson is sending you clothing by wagons from Nashville; he sends by way of Sparta to Kingston. You will have to send out and divert the course of the train. The clothing will leave Nashville in two trains, one leaving there on the 18th, other on the 20th.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

CHATTANOOGA, November 15, 1863.

(Received 16th.)

Major-General BURNSIDE:

If General Wilson and Mr. Dana have started back, you will please send by courier or telegraph for them to return to you, as I and desirous they should remain with you for the present.*

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

---------------

*See also Grant to Burnside in Grant's report, Part II, p.30.

---------------