War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0152 KY.,SW.VA.,Tennessee,MISS.,N.ALA., AND N.GA. Chapter XLIII.

Search Civil War Official Records

go to work to accomplish the intention, and hope in the course of two days to forward from this post and Paducah all the available rails,&c., asked for.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. J. SMITH,

Brigadier-General.

BRIDGEPORT, November 14, 1863.

Maj. Gen. U. S. GRANT,

Chattanooga:

I understand a steam-boat will be down this afternoon and leave for Kelly's Ford to-night. I will come to Chattanooga in her and bring with me Major Sanger and one servant; would like to have three saddled horses to meet me at Kelly's Ford to-morrow. I expect Ewing's division to be up to-day, and John E. Smith should reach the mouth of Battle Creek to-night. Blair is reported at Maysville with the two other divisions, but he should be far on this side. I can make no estimate of the time he should reach Bridgeport; he ought to make 15 or 20 miles a day. I am uneasy about Corinth, but presume Hurlbut will reach it via Hamburg. There are plenty of stores at Eastport.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

PULASKI, Tennessee, November 14, 1863.

Major-General SHERMAN:

One of the scouts has returned from Rome. A very small garrison there only; all troops are to the front. Cheatham's old division with other troops moved to Charleston, Tennessee, some time ago; other troops started, but were stopped. Every effort is being made to feed Bragg's army where it is, but the universal talk among all is that they must get into Tennessee or Kentucky to do it, and that a desperate effort to do this will be made in the fall. The suffering and destitution is all that it is represented to be, and the disaffection in the army and among the citizens is very great.

Lee went to Okolona via Russellville last Thursday, leaving Roddey to guard the river from Decatur to Dickson.

My men are at the various ferries on the river, and there are now nothing but straggling bands of not over 100 north of the river. Large supplies of meat and corn are being gathered in the Coosa Valley, but not removed.

G. M. DODGE,

Brigadier-General.

BRIDGEPORT, November 14, 1863.

General G. M. DODGE,

Pulaski, via Columbia:

I have telegraphic orders from General Grant, but shall go in person to Chattanooga to confer with him. The Fifteenth Army Corps will all assemble here, preparatory to new move. General Grant approved my order to take all serviceable horses and mules, and to