War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0147 Chapter XLIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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KNOXVILLE, November 14, 1863.

Major-General GRANT:

The following just received. This clearly demonstrates that Longstreet is intending to cross the river:

LENOIR'S, November 13, 1863.

General BURNSIDE:

Davis has cone in. The men he sent out have been to Philadelphia and Sweet Water. Stevenson's command has been replaced by three divisions of Longstreet's and a force of cavalry commanded by Armstrong. Longstreet arrived at Sweet Water himself last evening, and part of his command at Philadelphia at 10 o'clock last night. They brought up a pontoon train on the cars and unloaded half-way between Sweet Water and Philadelphia. The rebel soldiers were all through the country for food. They said they must get to Kentucky or starve. I have not seen those men; one will return for more news. They are stopping on the river 12 miles below here. Longstreet is reported 15,000 strong. His regiments very small, and I have a report that a brigade of cavalry is at Bird's, in Belmont Country, under Dibrell; the regiments small. I rode up the Little Tennessee as far as the first ford this evening. Rebels have a strong picket there, say 100; having no escort I returned.

R. B. POTTER,

Brigadier-General.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

KNOXVILLE, November 14, 1863.

Major-General GRANT:

The enemy are reported by General White to have thrown a regiment of infantry across in boats at Huff's Ferry, 6 miles below Loudon, and to be engaged in throwing a pontoon bridge at that place. It is almost definitely ascertained that Longstreet is at or near Loudon with the main body of his force.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

KNOXVILLE, November 14, 1863-12 m.

General BURNSIDE,

Lenoir's:

Dispatch received. General Sanders sends word that Major Graham was attacked early this morning at Maryville, and most of his men captured. Sanders moved out to his aid with First Kentucky and Forty-fifth Ohio. Met the enemy 2 miles out; the First Kentucky was in the advance and was driven back, but he succeeded in rallying them, and was driving them back when he received my first letter of this morning. He says he can fall back without further trouble. I have ordered Colonel Biddle's cavalry to report to you.

JNO. G. PARKE,

Major-General.

KNOXVILLE, November 14, 1863.

Colonel BYRD,

Kingston:

Have the brigade of infantry in readiness to move at a half hour's notice. It is more than likely that we will have to bring in in this direction. You have received General White's message to me.