War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0129 Chapter XLIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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and found no rebels, but were credibly informed that 100 rebels were on picket at Motley's Ford. The party who came up to the Maryville pickets were only a small party-some 15 or 20-and ought to have been captured. They moved toward Louisville. I hope Captain H. will get some or all of them; he reports that his scouts had followed them 5 miles, and I presume are still after them; they can take any direction they please; as the country is full of roads and quite open, they may all get back. Scouts say the rebels are moving strong guards to all the fords, as they report, to prevent deserters from getting across. Three Englishmen are here and report that they came up from Bragg's army, first from near the mines and through Athens and several other places, and report as I sent you to-day.

W. P. SANDERS,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, CAVALRY CORPS, Rockford, November 12, 1863.

[Maj. Gen. JOHN G. PARKE,

Chief of Staff:]

GENERAL: All quiet and no rebels 10 miles beyond Maryville at 9 a.m. The party that came in last night came across by the Chilhowee Mountains, took a lower road, came up to the pickets, and went out by the way of Montvale Springs and across the mountains. They were led by a doctor from Maryville; stole a few horses. I think they should have been caught, but as they came in on the same road the scouts had started on, Captain Harrison thought had captured his scouts and were in much larger force, and only prepared to resist them when they had got too far ahead. There were not more than 15 in the party. I sent another regiment out to relieve the Twelfth to-day. I sent 6 deserters in this morning, and 5 now from Chattanooga on the 3rd. No news by them.

Respectfully,

W. P. SANDERS,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, CAVALRY CORPS, Rockford, November 12, 1863.

Maj. Gen. J. G. PARKE,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: Mr. Cruise, one of the scouts, has just come in. He has been up between Motley's Island and the foot of the mountains, and confirms the report of a force above Motley's. They are at the ford of Citico River, 8 miles above, and would prevent a surprise unless they all go to sleep. This river is larger than I supposed, as he says it is nearly or quite twice the size of this.

He says there is no regular picket above the Citico, but they patrol above as far as the mountain. My trip was proposed on the supposition, as reported, that there was nothing above but the ordinary picket. I think I could recross without trouble; but it will not pay to march the horses so far without we could surprise the Motley's Island force, and as the reports now have them stationed I do not

9 R R-VOL XXXI, PT III