War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0118 KY.,SW.VA.,Tennessee,MISS.,N.ALA., AND N.GA. Chapter XLIII.

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KNOXVILLE, November 11, 1863-3.15 p.m.

General SANDERS,

Commanding Cavalry Division:

Yours of 11.25 a.m. just received. The commanding general directs me to inform you that you have full authority for making a trip across the Little Tennessee with the view of capturing some of the enemy's force on the other side.

The general suggests that you cross the river at or near the foot of the mountain, and sweep down on the south side, recrossing at the ford near the mouth. If practicable, it would be well to start to-night. If you determine to make the move, let us know, and we will send Colonel Biddle out to hold your present position in your absence; and also communicate with General Potter. His bridge over the Holston at Lenoir's will probably be completed to-night. It would be well to take over 1,000 or 1,200 men. The commanding general does not wish you to understand this as an order to go unless your own judgment and information approve of the move, and the chances of success would make it pay. The remarks as to places of crossing and recrossing are to be taken as suggestions. The plan and decision will be left entirely with you. We have no further information of the enemy's infantry, further than came from your camp.

Yours, respectfully,

JNO. G. PARKE,

Major-General.

P. S.-If you determinate to make the move, please let us know the route, so that couriers may follow you.

J. G. P.

KNOXVILLE, November 11, 1863-6.30 p.m.

General SANDERS,

Commanding Cavalry Division:

The commanding general wishes me to write you that in giving you the authority to make the trip on the other side of the Little Tennessee, he was mainly prompted by your offer. In deciding upon the move he wished you to consider well the results and its paying chances. You know that our force of cavalry is light, and it is necessary to husband it, and the general is desirous that its strength be no further reduce. Still, if you desire to go, he wishes it understood that the responsibility rests entirely with him, no matter what the result. In other words, he says, go if you think you have reasonable prospects of success, and they are worth the wear and tear.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. G. PARKE,

Major-General.

WINCHESTER, November 11, 1863-a.m.

Major-General GRANT:

My leading division is now passing through Winchester. Another is on its heels. I sent word back to Blair last night to take the road for Stevenson via New Market and Maysville. Do you what