War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0117 Chapter XLIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

there were some camp-fires on the opposite side of the river at Morganton, a few above and some below. Nothing new from the immediate from. The fire supposed to be at Cade's Cove is, I think, one up the river 7 or 8 miles that I saw day before yesterday. The last man I saw from Cade's Cove says the Indians are reported in Cherokee County. If I even thought of sending scouts out on every report of citizens, I would have no horses left in a few days.

Respectfully,

W. P. SANDERS,

Brigadier-General.

P. S.-Please send some envelopes if you can spare them. Colonel Adams has just come in having, been relieved by another regiment. He had scouts on the river yesterday and last night, and there were no rebels on this side. He saw some citizens, who were prisoners and escaped, who say positively that the infantry have all gone back; that the cavalry are only making a show here, and that they will all fall [back] not later than day after to-morrow. Of course you can judge of the correctness of this or not. I will know by

to-night, unless my citizens scouts are caught, whether there is any truth in regard to Longstreet's being up this way or not.

Respectfully,

W. P. SANDERS.

There may be some 60 Indians near Cade's Cove, as one of my scouts has reported them there.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, CAVALRY CORPS, Rockford, November 11, 1863.

[Maj. General JOHN G. PARKE:]

GENERAL: It is, I think, too late to start to-night, as we would not be able to reach the camp until after daylight some time, and some of the guides I will need are out of the way. Your dispatch did not reach here until dark. I will, unless something occurs, start from here to-morrow evening, so as to go out as far as Maryville and feed, and start from there at dark. Will take some of the home guards, or, if necessary, soldiers, and put a guard over every rebel's house on the road, and be among them by or soon after daylight. My intention is to cross near the mountain-day before yesterday there was no picket there-and surprise them, and I though, if successful, cross again at Motley's Island. It is a bad ford below, but I can hold the ford and see what is below.

All quiet in the front. Of the horses, 107 were pronounced wholly and totally unfit for service,and I think myself they are. Last night the Twelfth Kentucky drew 92 after dark,a nd 2 of them died before they reached camp. I will have the scouts sent out as usual to-morrow from Maryville. I will leave my camp here and, I think, a sufficient guard.

Respectfully,

W. P. SANDERS,

Brigadier-General.