War of the Rebellion: Serial 056 Page 0075 Chapter XLIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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CHATTANOOGA, November 7, 1863.

Colonel T. S. BOWERS,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

If barges cannot go up the river to Big South Fork, have steamers go with their freight.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Chattanooga, November 7, 1863.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General U. S. Army:

Many soldiers of the Confederate Army who were paroled at Vicksburg are found within the country now occupied by this army. I have the honor to request instructions as to the proper disposition to be made of such cases. Are they to be regarded as prisoners of war and as such forwarded for exchange, or are they to be permitted to return south to await exchange if they so desire? Many of them wish to take the oath of allegiance and remain within our lines.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH CORPS, ASSISTANT INSPECTOR-GENERAL'S OFFICE, November 7, 1863. [Received 8th.]

Major-General HOWARD,

Commanding Corps:

GENERAL: The bearer will deliver to you a deserter. He left Longstreet's corps, composed of Jenkins', McLaws', and Pickett's divisions, and one brigade of cavalry, night before last when he [Longstreet] moved to Knoxville with this force. He reports nothing in our front except a thin line of pickets and the artillery on Lookout Mountain. Bragg's old army, he says, is all that is left in front of Chattanooga. Longstreet's corps marched with three days' rations.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHAS. W. ASMUSSEN,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Assistant Inspector-General.

HDQRS. THIRD BRIG., SECOND DIV., 14TH ARMY CORPS, November 7, 1863.

General REYNOLDS:

The devil to pay upon the other side of the river, if smoke indicates anything. About fifteen minutes ago a dense volume of smoke burst out behind the woods in Chickamauga Valley some distance from the river on the other side, just about the spot where their cars stop. Some large and combustible materials are burning-make a dense white smoke which ascends far above the tree-tops. I saw,