War of the Rebellion: Serial 055 Page 0723 Chapter XLIII. THE CHATTANOOGA-RINGGOLD CAMPAIGN.

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[Inclosures.]

A.

HDQRS. FORCES WEST OF CHATTANOOGA CREE,

General Hardee's Headquarters, November 24, 1863.

Colonel GEORGE WILLIAM BRENT,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of Tennessee:

COLONEL: Agreeably to a suggestion in a letter from Lieutenant-Colonel Roy, General Hardee's assistant adjutant-general, I came to this place to-night to establish my headquarters, but I find that I am on the opposite side of the creek and some distance from the extreme right of my line. I will return quickly to the mountain, which is more central from which I can overlook my whole command communicate by signal from my extreme left to right-and by couriers in case of fog-from stations which I have established at the base of the mountain.

I am, colonel, respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. L. STEVENSON,

Major-General, Commanding.

B.

HEADQUARTERS WALTHALL'S BRIGADE,

Craven House, November 24, 1863-8 a.m.

MAJOR: It is foggy this morning and nothing can be distinctly seen, but I feel sure the enemy's pontoons have both disappeared, and most of the tents in Chattanooga have been removed. Troops are moving rapidly to the left; in what numbers it is difficult to estimate. The lines of the enemy in front of their works visible on yesterday are still to be see. They seemed to have bivouacked there. A steam-boat is busy in the river beyond the town from here. The fog has thickened so within the last thirty minutes that I can see nothing.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. C. WALTHALL,

Brigadier-General.

C.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,

Missionary Ridge, November 24, 1863-a.m.

Major-General STEVENSON,

Commanding Division:

GENERAL: The general commanding directs me to say that you are charged with the defenses on the left of Chattanooga Creek. If the enemy attempt to cross the creek you must defend obstinately, calling on the forces to your left, and also on Breckinridge, on your right, for assistance. Should you be compelled to yield, the force on the mountain and at Craven house must be withdrawn in time to save them from being cut off. In a last resort the Craven house command could pass on the old road leading up the mountain and form a junction with the force coming down; or in case of extreme necessity they could move south on the mountain. But this only an extreme case.

Report fully and frequently by letter and signal all movements in our front.

I am, general, very respectfully,

KINLOCH FALCONER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.