War of the Rebellion: Serial 055 Page 0664 KY.,SW. VA.,Tennessee,MISS.,N. ALA.,AND N. GA. Chapter XLIII.

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DETACHED.

Roddey's Cavalry Brigade.

4th Alabama, Colonel William A. Johnson.

5th Alabama, Colonel Josiah Patterson.

53rd Alabama, Colonel M. W. Hannon,

Moreland's (Alabama) Battalion, Lieutenant Colonel M. D. Moreland.

Georgia Battery, Captain C. B. Ferrell.

KINLOCH FALCONER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

Numbers 219.

Report of General Braxton Bragg, C. S. Army, commanding Army of Tennessee, with field dispatches, etc.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE, Dalton, Ga., November 30, 1863.

SIR: On Monday, the 23d, the enemy advanced in heavy force and drove in our picket line in front of Missionary Ridge, but made no further effort.

On Tuesday morning early they threw over the river a heavy force opposite the north end of the ridge and just below the mouth of the Chickamauga, at the same time displaying a heavy force in our immediate front. After visiting the right and making dispositions there for the new development in that direction, I returned toward the left to find a heavy cannonading going on from the enemy's batteries on our forces occupying the slope of Lookout Mountain between the crest and the river. A very heavy force soon advanced to the assault, and was met by one brigade only (Walthall's) which made a desperate resistance, but was finally compelled to yield ground. Why this command was not sustained is yet unexplained. The commander on that part of the field (Major-General Stevenson) had six brigades at his disposal. Upon his urgent appeal another brigade was dispatched in the afternoon to his support, though it appeared his own forces had not been brought into action and I proceeded to the scene. Arriving just before sunset, I found we had lost all the advantages of the position. Orders were immediately given for the ground to be disputed until we could withdraw our forces across Chattanooga Creek, and the movement was commenced. This having been successfully accomplished, our whole forces were concentrated on the ridge and extended to the right to meet the movement in that direction.

On Wednesday, the 25th, I again visited the extreme right, now under Lieutenant-General Hardee, and threatened by a heavy force, while strong columns could be seen marching in that direction. A very heavy force in line of battle confronted our left and center.

On my return to this point, about 11 a. m., the enemy's forces were being moved in heavy masses from Lookout and beyond to our front, while those in front extended to our right. They formed their lines with great deliberation just beyond the range of our guns and in plain view of our position. Though greatly outnumbered, such was the strength or our position that no doubt was entertained of