War of the Rebellion: Serial 055 Page 0436 KY.,SW.VA.,Tennessee,MISS.,N.ALA.,AND N.GA. Chapter XLIII.

Search Civil War Official Records

to throw out one regiment as skirmishers. I sent the One hundred and second New York Volunteers with instructions to let their left rest on Lookout Creek and their right join the left of the skirmishers of the Second Brigade. As soon as they were deployed, I gave the command "front," and then "forward."

We marched in line of battle over almost insurmountable obstacles. About 1 1/2 miles from where we crossed, skirmish firing commenced. We pushed on; the firing became heavier, and when we had gone about 1 mile farther, we found quite a large force of the enemy, but we kept steadily advancing (we were at this time losing heavily) until we came in sight of a breastwork near a rebel camp. Here our men stood for a moment, when I gave the order "fix bayonets," and before the command "charge" could be given our colors were over the works and prisoners were coming in by hundreds, who were passed to the troops in the rear, which I have since understood to have been General Whitaker's brigade. I could not weaken my small force by sending guards to the rear with them, and for the same reason was obliged to leave my wounded where they fell. On seeing our colors so far in front, our men advanced on the run; and such was their impetuosity that abatis and felled timber were no obstacles whatever, but on they dashed-the Sixtieth New York Volunteers, led by Colonel Abel Godard cheering and encouraging his men by his example; the One hundred and forty-ninth New York Volunteers, led by Colonel Barnum and Lieutenant-Colonel Randall in the most gallant style; the One hundred and thirty-seventh New York Volunteers, led by Captain Milo B. Eldredge-sweeping everything before them. After them we rushed around the end of the mountain, the colors always in advance, capturing large numbers of prisoners and some flags, and on past a white house on the Summertown road. Here the brigade got separated by a natural obstruction; the One hundred and forty-ninth New York Volunteers went to the left, and advancing to some rifle-works drove the enemy out handsomely. They had advanced but a short distance from these works when I sent Captain Nolan, acting assistant inspector-general, to direct Colonel Randall to halt there and hold that position. The Sixtieth New York Volunteers and the One hundred and thirty-seventh New York Volunteers went to the right of the white house, and while passing it the One hundred and thirty-seventh New York Volunteers captured two pieces of artillery with their limbers and a large quantity of intrenching tools. They swept their colors over the guns, and in accordance with my orders left no guard with them, but kept steadily advancing until about 300 yards from the house. I there established my line, which was afterward held until the enemy evacuated the mountain. The line at this time was oblique; the right was thrown forward and still joined the Second Brigade; the left was resting on Chattanooga Creek. This point was reached about 12.15 p.m. Shortly afterward Captain Stegman reported to me with a few skirmishers of the One hundred and second New York Volunteers. I sent them to the left of the One hundred and forty-ninth New York Volunteers, which was threatened by the enemy, who were evidently in force at that point. Half an hour after establishing the line the enemy pushed it very hard, but the men stood firm. I sent my aide, Lieutenant A. R. Greene, to Brigadier-General Whitaker for re-enforcements. One regiment was sent to the support of the One hundred and forty-ninth New York Volunteers, but none to the support of the remainder of the brigade.