War of the Rebellion: Serial 055 Page 0091 THE CHATTANOOGA-RINGGOLD CAMPAIGN. Chapter XLIII.

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conduct of the officers and troops was everything that could be expected. Missionary Ridge was carried simultaneously at six different points.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-chief.

CHATTANOOGA, Tennessee, November 26, 1863-11 p.m.

(Received 3.20 a.m., 27th.)

General Davis, commanding a division of the Fourteenth Corps, operating with General Sherman, gained possession of the Chickamauga Depot at 12.30 o'clock to-day. My troops, having pursued by the Rossville and Graysville road, came upon the enemy's cavalry at New Bridge, posted on the east side of the creek. They retired on the approach of our troops. The column will be detained for a few hours, to rebuild the bridge, but Hooker thinks he can reach Graysville, and, perhaps, Ringgold, to-night. Many stragglers have been picked up to-day-perhaps 2,000. Among the prisoners are many who were paroled at Vicksburg. What shall I do with them?

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

CHATTANOOGA., Tennessee, November 27, 1863-12 p.m.

(Received 4.50 p.m., 28th.)

General Palmer reports that Johnston's division, Fourteenth Corps, surprised A. P. Stewart's division last night, taking four guns, two caissons, and many prisoners. Hooker reports his arrival at Ringgold at 9 a.m. to-day. Found the road strewn with caissons, limbers, and ambulances, and he commenced skirmishing with the enemy at 11 a.m. in the railroad pass or gap, near Ringgold. About half of Osterhaus' and third of Geary's divisions engaged and forced the enemy to abandon the position he had taken in the passes. Both divisions suffered severely, the enemy making obstinate resistance.

On the morning of the 24th, I sent Colonel Long, commanding Second Brigade, Second Cavalry Division, across South Chickamauga, to make raids on the East Tennessee and George Railroad. He returned this evening, bringing 250 prisoners, and reports that he destroyed the railroad from Tyner's Station to the Hiwassee and 10 miles southwest of Cleveland. He also destroyed 80 wagons, large quantities of commissary stores, and other supplies at Cleveland. He attempted to destroy the pontoon across the Hiwassee, but found it too strongly guarded for his force.

By direction of General Grant, I will send General Gordon Granger early to-morrow up the Tennessee, to harass Longstreet as much as possible, and draw him away from Knoxville. The prisoners we have taken since the 23rd now sum up more than 5,000. I have three steam-boats running between Bridgeport and this place. As soon as