War of the Rebellion: Serial 055 Page 0069 Chapter XLIII. THE CHATTANOOGA-RINGGOLD CAMPAIGN.

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building a bridge across Chattanooga Creek, and only came up in time to occupy a part of the ridge on the extreme right. Prisoners state the number of the enemy engaged at 25,000. Bragg himself was in command and was among the fugitives before our assaulting columns. Among Sherman's wounded are Generals Corse, Matthies, and Giles A. Smith. Our men are frantic with joy and enthusiasm, and received Grant, as he rode along the lines after the victory, with tumultuous shouts. Good.

[C. A. DANA.]

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

CHATTANOOGA, November 26, 1863-10 a.m.

Prisoners taken yesterday reported this morning at 3,500 but probably not over 3,000 with 52 stand small-arms, 10 flags. Among prisoners large proportion officers from colonels down. Sheridan continued the fight on our right, along the east slope of Missionary Ridge, until 9 p.m., by the light of the full moon. He took there 300 prisoners, 13 cannon, and a train of 12 wagons. On our left Bragg burned a train he could not carry off. Bragg has rallied his forces within the forks of the Chickamauga, on the Rossville and Ringgold road. Sherman and Hooker, with Baird's and Stanley's divisions, Fourteenth Corps, ordered to move upon him at 7 a.m. this morning. Grant has just gone out to the front, expecting Bragg to fight another battle rather than abandon Longstreet's line of retreat. Prisoners say Longstreet was ordered back day before yesterday, and Buckner, who had been started to re-enforce Longstreet, was sent for on Monday. Battle yesterday was fought by corps of Hardee (late Polk's) and Breckinridge, 25,000 to 30,000 men in all. Hardee was before Sherman; Breckinridge before Thomas. Breckinridge was with Bragg at the moment of the rout, and they escaped together. The storming of the ridge by our troops was one of the greatest miracles in military history. No man who climbs the ascent by any of the roads that wind along its front can believe that 18,000 men were moved up its broken and crumbling face unless it was his fortune to witness the deed. It seems as awful as a visible interposition of God. Neither Grant nor Thomas intended it. Their orders were to carry the rifle-pits along the base of the ridge and capture their occupants, but when this was accomplished the unaccountable spirit of the troops bore them bodily up those impracticable steeps, over the bristling rifle-pits on the crest and the thirty cannon enfilading every gully. The order to storm appears to have been given simultaneously by Generals Sheridan and Wood, because the men were not to be held back, dangerous as the attempt appeared to military prudence. Besides, the generals had caught the inspiration of the men, and were ready themselves to undertake impossibilities.

Our losses in this assault are estimated at about 2,000 though we have no report yet. Probably the total casualties of this great battle will not exceed 5,000.

[C. A. DANA.]

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.