War of the Rebellion: Serial 055 Page 0068 KY., SW. VA., Tennessee, MISS., N. ALA., AND N. GA.

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[CHAP. XLIII.

CHATTANOOGA, November 25, 1863-1 p.m.

Soon after my dispatch of 9 a.m. battle commenced on our left, the attack being made by Sherman apparently, though no report from him yet received. Fight raged very furiously all forenoon, both east of Missionary Ridge and along its crest this way toward Knoxville railroad tunnel, which we gained about 12 m. On our right rebels all gone. Hooker moving the troops under his command along Rossville road. Rebels just opened artillery in that direction, apparently at his column. In our front here rebel rifle-pits are fully manned, preventing Thomas gaining ridge.

[C. A. DANA.]

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

CHATTANOOGA, November 25, 1863-4.30 p.m.

Glory to God. The day is decisively ours. Missionary Ridge has just been carried by a magnificent charge of Thomas' troops, and rebels routed. Hooker has got in their rear.

[C. A. DANA.]

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

We have taken to-day 2,000 prisoners and thirty pieces of artillery. The nature of the ridge allowed the main body of the rebels to escape. The losses of Thomas' army are very slight, and I hear of no prominent officer among them killed except Colonel Phelps, commanding a brigade. The heights which Thomas carried by assault are at least 500 feet above Chattanooga Valley, with an inclination of at least 45, and exceedingly rugged and difficult. Up to 2 p.m. the battle raged principally on our left, and though we have not yet a report of our losses in that quarter, they must have been very severe, the enemy having made vigorous efforts to crush him and dislodge him from his position on the ridge. Having repelled these attacks Sherman undertook to take by storm a battery which the rebels obstinately maintained upon the hill above the tunnel. Whether he employed his own troops or those of other corps I do not know, but I saw the column sent up for this purpose twice repulsed, falling back the first time in disorder. The rebels having sent the great mass of their troops to crush Sherman, Grant gave orders at 2 p.m. for an assault upon their lines in front of Thomas, but owing to the fault of Granger, who devoted himself to firing a battery instead of commanding his corps, Grant's order was not transmitted to the division commanders until he repeated it an hour later. Accordingly it was not executed until after 4 p.m., when the nearness of night rendered it impracticable to follow up and complete the victory.

I find that I was mistaken in reporting in my dispatch of 4.30 p.m. that Hooker had got in the enemy' rear. He was delayed in