War of the Rebellion: Serial 055 Page 0066 KY., SW. VA., Tennessee,MISS., N. ALA., AND N. GA.

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[CHAP. XLIII.

self, Grant's orders that he should get all his troops here before Friday night having been positive, and it was his own duty to see that nothing hindered his arrival. Clear.

[C. A. DANA.]

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

CHATTANOOGA, November 23, 1863-8 p.m.

Our casualties are about 75 in all, including both killed and wounded. After 4 p.m. rebels opened artillery from top of Missionary Ridge; the total number of cannot they displayed about twelve, all small caliber. Just before dark they displayed a force on our left where Howard had taken up his position. Nothing shows decisively whether enemy will fight or fly. Grant thinks latter; other judicious officers think former. River has risen 5 feet since yesterday morning. Enormous quantities of drift. Both Chattanooga bridge and Brown's Ferry bridge broken. Current furious; difficult to anchor pontoons firmly. Woods' division still remains in Lookout Valley.

[C. A. DANA.]

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

CHATTANOOGA, November 23, 1863-9 p.m.

My report of 3.30 p.m. was erroneous in failing to state that General Samuel Beatty's brigade, of Wood's division, held the extreme left in the movement, Willich forming the center, and Hazen the right of that division. Beatty co-operated efficiently, and carried some rifle-pits in the open field very gallantly; an exploit I attributed to Willich. We have 6 officers killed and wounded. Our troops are slashing trees in their front. High spirits.

[C. A. DANA.]

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

CHATTANOOGA, November 24, 1863-7.30 p.m.

I have spent the day observing the movements of the forces on our left under Sherman. His leading brigade, under General Giles A. Smith, embarked in pontoon-boats in North Chickamauga Creek about midnight, and, dropping down the Tennessee, landed on the south bank, just above the mouth of the Chickamauga Creek about 2.30 a.m., surprising and securing a rebel picket of 19 men. The remainder of the division of Morgan L. Smith and the whole of John E. Smith's were ferried across by daylight, landing south of the Chickamauga. They immediately set about digging rifle-pits to cover the bridge, whose construction proceeded with great vigor under the personal direction of General William F. Smith. The transportation of the troops was continued by pontoon-boats and the steamer Dunbar, which arrived at the crossing about 8 a.m. The bridge was finished shortly before 1 p.m., when Sherman instantly set his troops in motion. He had just been strengthened by the ar-