War of the Rebellion: Serial 055 Page 0056 KY., SW. VA., Tennessee, MISS., N. ALA., AND N. GA.

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[CHAP. XLIII.

army moved into Lookout Valley for convenience of supply. The position there is naturally much stronger for us than this.

Enemy is concentrating on and about Lookout Mountain. Many new camp fires appeared there last night. Their force at Stevens' Gap, especially, seems to be strengthened. Engineers report that gaps at Whiteside's, Nickajack, and Moore's Spring can be fortified without much work, so that small force can resist any attack.

[C. A. DANA.]

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

CHATTANOOGA, November 4, 1863-9 p.m.

Examination of Lookout Valley to-day shows no rebel force on that slope of the head of the mountain. No firing from battery on summit. Many deserters came in to-day. All report Buckner and Cheatham gone up river. Weather very warm; clear.

[C. A. DANA.]

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

CHATTANOOGA, November 4, 1863-10 p.m.

Dispatch from Sherman, dated Eastport, 31st, just received. Two gunboats and 3 ferry-boats had just reached him, enabling to cross his troops rapidly. The two divisions which had advanced to Tuscumbia, which I have before erroneously reported as one brigade, had reached Eastport. With Ewing's and John E. Smith's divisions, which were already over, Sherman would immediately march to Athens. Could take only ten days' rations, and could use the corn and meat of the country freely. Sherman's army is 30,000 strong.

No news from Burnside. Grant thinks no more than 20,000 men have gone against Burnside from here.

Anderson, at Nashville, reports railroad better supplied with rolling stock than was supposed. Will be able at once to send down 60 freighted cars daily, and in a few days 70. Of these, Thomas requires 35 to be loaded with subsistence stores, no matter what the demand for other transportation. The steam-boats on this river, which have hitherto come up no farther than Kelley's Ferry, are henceforth to come to Brown's Ferry, and land their cargoes at Lookout Valley bridge. This will save about 8 miles' wagoning, but will materially lengthen the time required for the voyage, as it takes as long to pass up the rapids as to make all the remainder of the trip from Bridgeport here. I suggest that gunboats of very light draught should be provided for this part of the Tennessee. General Meigs has taken measures to increase the number of transport steam-boats. The Dunbar still lies here. Her machinery is promised at Nashville next week. This steam-boat was brought from Fort Henry over the shoals after Grant captured that place. Grant desires me to go up to Burnside, and, if I do not hear from you to the contrary I propose to start about Saturday.

[C. A. DANA.]

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.