War of the Rebellion: Serial 055 Page 0051 Chapter XLIII. THE CHATTANOOGA-RINGGOLD CAMPAIGN.

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cavalry. I do not think it is their intention to make an advance movement. I will know more concerning their position and movements as soon as my detachment of cavalry left in direction of Trenton comes up. I expect them every moment. All the wagons, except those required to take back two steam-engines, have been returned. We have only two batteries here. I inclose copy* of a letter captured here, written by one of General Hardee's staff.

Very respectfully,

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major-General, Commanding.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. MIL. DIV. OF THE MISS.,

Numbers 7.

In the Field, Chattanooga, Tennessee,

December 8, 1863.

The general commanding takes great pleasure in publishing to the brave armies under his command the following telegraphic dispatch just received from the President of the United States:

WASHINGTON, December 8, 1863.

Major-General GRANT:

Understanding that your lodgment at Chattanooga and Knoxville is now secure, I wish to tender you and all under your command my more than thanks, my profoundest gratitude for the skill, courage, and perseverance with which you and they, over so great difficulties, have effected that important object. God bless you all.

A. LINCOLN.

By order of Major General U. S. Grant:

T. S. BOWERS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. MIL. DIV. OF THE MISS.,

Numbers 9.

In the Field, Chattanooga, Tennessee

December 10, 1863.

The general commanding takes this opportunity of returning his sincere thanks and congratulations to the brave armies of the Cumberland, the Ohio, the Tennessee, and their comrades from the Potomac, for the recent splendid and decisive successes achieved over the enemy. In a short time you have recovered from him the control of the Tennessee River, from Bridgeport to Knoxville; you dislodged him from his great stronghold upon Lookout Mountain; drove him from Chattanooga Valley; wrested from his determined grasp the possession of Missionary Ridge; repelled, with heavy loss to him, his repeated assaults upon Knoxville, forcing him to raise the siege there; driving him at all points, utterly routed and discomfited, beyond the limits of the State. By your noble heroism and determined courage you have most effectually defeated the plans of the enemy for regaining possession of the States of Kentucky and Tennessee. You have secured positions from which no rebellious power can drive or dislodge you. For all this the general commanding thanks you collectively and individually. The loyal people of the United States thank and bless you. Their hopes and

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*Not found.

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