War of the Rebellion: Serial 055 Page 0045 Chapter XLIII. THE CHATTANOOGA-RINGGOLD CAMPAIGN.

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CHATTANOOGA, November 25, 1863.

Major General WILLIAM T. SHERMAN,

Near Chattanooga:

If you can, without interfering with the disposition of your troops for the attack, put in the brigade of Howard's corps now with you on your right, so that it may fall in on the left of its own corps as soon as the condition of affairs will permit, you will please do so, as his corps is small.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

CHATTANOOGA, November 25, 1863.

Major General GEORGE H. THOMAS,

Chattanooga:

I am directed by the general commanding to say that you will start a strong reconnaissance in the morning at 7 a.m., to ascertain the position of the enemy.

If it is ascertained that the enemy are in full retreat, follow them with all your force, except that which you intend Granger to take to Knoxville. This will make sufficient force to retain here. I have ordered Sherman to pursue also, he taking the most easterly road used by the enemy, if they have taken more than one.

Four days' rations should be got up to the men between this and morning, and also a supply of ammunition. I shall want Granger's expedition to get off by the day after to-morrow.

By order of Major-General Grant:

JNumbers A. RAWLINS,

Brigadier-General, and Chief of Staff.

CHATTANOOGA, November 25, 1863.

Major General WILLIAM T. SHERMAN,

Near Chattanooga.

No doubt you witnessed the handsome manner in which Thomas' troops carried Missionary Ridge this afternoon, and can feel a just pride, too, in the part taken by the forces under your command in taking, first, so much of the same range of hills, and then in attracting the attention of so many of the enemy as to make Thomas' part certain of success. The next thing now will be to relieve Burnside. I have heard from his to the evening of the 23d. At that time he had from ten to twelve days' supplies, and spoke hopefully of being able to hold out that length of time. My plan is to move your forces out gradually, until they reach the railroad between Cleveland and Dalton. Granger will move up the south side of the Tennessee with a column of 20,000 men, taking no wagons, or but few, with him. His men will carry four days' rations with them, and the steamer Chattanooga, loaded with rations, will accompany the expedition. I take it for granted that Bragg's entire force has left. If not, of course the first, thing is to dispose of him. If he has gone, the only thing necessary to do to-morrow will be to send out a reconnaissance to ascertain the whereabouts of the enemy.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.