War of the Rebellion: Serial 053 Page 0743 Chapter XLII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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the discontent. I am for the first time, I think, in my life, after serious reflection, unable to make up my mind as to the right, though I do not presume to say the conclusion was always wise.

Hill will be relieved. Who will take Polk's and his place is yet unknown. I would not be surprised if Buckner was promoted, and thus the discontent of the Army of Tennessee increased.

I tell you these Kentuckians understand getting along. The moment the battle is over, Preston nominates his colonels for brigades; Buckner, Preston for the division-the corollary that the commander must be a lieutenant-general.

Joe, I think I could be an intriguing politician; I see so clearly into their hands that I could go and do likewise if I did not prefer a quiet seat with self-respect to some other and less comfortable feeling. Pemberton is everything with Davis, the devout; his intelligence only equaled by his self-sacrifice to regard for others.

Have you any particular reasons for not writing to me? This is the fourth letter I have written since the great muss.

Your friend,

MACKALL.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY CORPS, Near Courtland, Ala., October 13, 1863.

Major General S. D. LEE,

Commanding Cavalry Corps:

GENERAL: I learn positively that General Roddey crossed the Tennessee River last Friday near Guntersville; I have not learned which route he took. I think it very possible if you should cross the river you might be able to form a junction with him. I fear General Roddey's position may be critical. I would give anything if I could cross the river immediately. I have not yet heard from General Bragg. I expect to hear to-night.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOS. WHEELER,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY CORPS, Near Courtland, Ala., October 13, 1863.

General STEPHEN D. LEE,

Commanding Cavalry Corps:

GENERAL: The enemy's cavalry which followed us to the river on our recent expedition, have, I learn, returned, some toward Pulaski and the remainder in other directions. I have sent out scouts to ascertain what direction they have taken and where they have gone. These scouts I sent out yesterday have not yet returned, and are probably following them some distance. I established a line of couriers to Mr. Foster's when I left you. I have not yet heard from General Bragg, but expect to hear some time this morning.

With great respect, your obedient servant,

JOS. WHEELER,

Major-General.