War of the Rebellion: Serial 053 Page 0713 Chapter XLII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

brigade temporarily at Brandon instead of Morton. Direct chief quartermaster and chief commissary not to permit stores to accumulate at Canton or Brandon.

J. E. JOHNSTON.

OXFORD, September 29, 1863.

General BRAGG,

Near Chattanooga:

I will send Major-General Lee with 2,000 cavalry to strike the railroad. Order Roddey to join him. He is said to be at Decatur. Might not a part of your own cavalry cross the river for the same object? I see no other mode in which I can help you. I have but five brigades of infantry including what is intended for Mobile. I will do all I can; only suggest.

J. E. JOHNSTON.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. STATE OF MISSISSIPPI, ADJT. AND INSP. Numbers 229.

GENERAL'S OFFICE, Macon, September 29, 1863.

Major General S. J. Gholson will report to Major General S. D. Lee, C. S. Army, the strength of the different cavalry organizations under his command, and what points they are stationed, and also co-operate with General Lee whenever so requested by him.

By order of John J. Pettus, Governor and Commander-in-Chief:

JONES S. HAMILTON,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

Extract of letter from General Bragg, dated 3 miles south of Chattanooga, September 29, 1863.

The question of subsistence should receive early attention, as our supplies are nearly exhausted at Atlanta.

OCTOBER 6, 1863.

Furnished for the information of Commissary-General.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

[First indorsement.]

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF SUBSISTENCE, October 7, 1863.

Respectfully referred to the Secretary of War.

The subsistence of General Bragg's army has been a subject of solicitude since its withdrawal from Kentucky, and the efforts of the Commissary-General of Subsistence to get the railroad running from Columbia to Decatur, so as to supply his army, and many other incidents must have informed General Bragg that it has received constant attention. His army has consumed largely of the reserves at Atlanta. He knows that his army is drawing its supplies from the South. The present call for early attention is superfluous. The Secretary of War is respectfully referred to an