War of the Rebellion: Serial 053 Page 0701 Chapter XLII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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HEADQUARTERS RIGHT WING, ARMY OF TENNESSEE, Missionary Ridge, September 24, 1863-9 a. m.

Major R. M. MASON,

Quartermaster:

MAJOR: The lieutenant-general commanding directs that you move your train from its present encampment to Holly Springs, on the east side of Chickamauga Creek, near Shallow Ford.

Respectfully, major, your obedient servant,

[T. M. JACK,]

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS RIGHT WING, ARMY OF TENNESSEE, Missionary Ridge, September 24, 1863.

Brigadier General N. B. FORREST,

Commanding Cavalry:

GENERAL: Colonel Rucker informs General Polk that his brigade commander has ordered his regiment to move from its present position on the right of General Polk's line. He wishes to learn whether another regiment has been ordered to take the place of Rucker's. This position should not be unoccupied by cavalry, and he desires Colonel Rucker to remain where he is until relieved by another regiment.

Please answer by return courier.

Respectfully, general, your obedient servant,

[T. M. JACK,]

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS LONGSTREET'S CORPS, September 24, 1863.

Major-General BUCKNER,

Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: The commanding general directs me to say that the indications are strong that the enemy was to retire from our front to-night and across the river. He desires, therefore, that you will send forward as far as practicable some select men to observe the movements of the enemy and listen for the rumbling of their vehicles should they move off. Please let them be carefully instructed as to their duties, and told that they may gather information better by putting their ears to the ground and listening. Give them orders, if they shall become satisfied that the enemy is moving, to advance and deliver their fire; or, they may do this the better, to ascertain if the enemy is still there, by the fact of his returning the fire. The commanding general is exceedingly anxious to discover the movement in time to prevent the escape of their whole army across the river, or at least to save their bridges. Please use every effort that your experience and judgment may suggest to accomplish this result.

I am, sir, very respectfully,

G. M. SORREL,

Assistant Adjutant-General.