War of the Rebellion: Serial 053 Page 0651 Chapter XLII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

is no immediate danger from the direction of Tazewell and Mercer. Ascertain to what extent I can rely on the home guards to protect the salt-works. It would help me very much to be able to take Wharton's troops away from that service.

SAM. JONES,

Major-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF WESTERN VIRGINIA AND EAST TENN.,

Bristol, Tenn., September 14, 1863.

Mr. JAMES W. SHEFFEY,

Marion:

Please inform me to what extent home guards have been organized in your county, who is at the head of the organization, and about how many I can rely on to turn out to defend the salt-works, if necessary.

SAM. JONES,

Major-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF WESTERN VIRGINIA AND EAST TENN.,

Bristol, Tenn., September 14, 1863.

B. JOHNSTON, Esq.,

Abingdon:

You cannot too strongly impress on the people the importance of organizing for home defense as soon as possible.

SAM. JONES,

Major-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF WESTERN VIRGINIA AND EAST TENN.,

Bristol, Tenn., September 14, 1863.

Major J. F. KENT,

Wytheville:

The home guards should be held in readiness to turn out on shortest notice. To what extent can I rely on the home guards of Wytheville to protect the salt-works, if necessary?

SAM. JONES,

Major-General

MONTGOMERY, September 15, 1863.

Lieutenant-General HARDEE,

Enterprise, Miss.:

You say the raid is intended for the Memphis and Charleston Railroad; is it not the Mobile and Ohio? You don't name the probable force; I suggest if possible bringing a superior one against it. If Chalmers and Ferguson are not sufficient, let Jackson re-enforcements and send infantry on railroad trains to threatened points.

J. E. JOHNSTON.