War of the Rebellion: Serial 053 Page 0551 Chapter XIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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[Inclosure Numbers 1.]

OFFICE CHIEF COMMISSARY OF SUBSISTENCE OF TENNESSEE,

Loudon, Tenn., August 13, 1863.

If the farmers can be induced to thrash out their crop of wheat and put it in market, which, however, is extremely doubtful, in consequence of the scarcity of labor and the light value placed upon our currency by them, I can abundantly supply your wants as indicated, and, in fact, twice as much more.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. T. WILSON,

Major and Chief Commissary of Subsistence.

[Indorsement.]

The letter from which the above is an extract refers to the supply of flour, two days out of seven or more.

G. M. H.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

OFFICE CHIEF COMMISSARY OF SUBSISTENCE OF TENNESSEE,

Loudon, Tenn., August 20, 1863.

In reply to your inquiry as to the probable time and amount of meant I can supply, I can but reiterate what I have stated before, to wit: That I do not hope under the most energetic system of collection to do more in the meat ration than to supply, say, a semimonthly delivery of 100,000 pounds of fresh beef and 20,000 pounds of bacon. For the answer to the seeming small amount as above, I refer you to the small and exhausted condition of my field of labor. Major Cummings is in charge, as you are aware, of a reserve which was in a large degree collected from the only part of my territory now held by our arms, and this, together with other causes, say constant occupation by army and consequent exhaustion of the cereals so necessary to the production of meat, the diversion of labor from agriculture to the army, it being mostly white, the light appreciation of the money and the consequent disinclination of the disloyal to prepare their hogs for market on that acount, have, together with the drainage by previous purchase for the subsistence of the army of East Tennessee, completely exhausted, in all that part of Tennessee now open to us, the supply of bacon; and there is no use of shutting our eyes to the fact that there is no bacon worth speaking of in the country, and that if it can't be had from beyond the limits of this State, the armies can't be supplied.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. T. WILSON,

Major and Chief Commissary of Subsistence of Tennessee.

[Inclosure Numbers 3.]

OFFICE DISTRICT COMMISSARY,

Atlanta, August 21, 1863.

In your telegram you ask me to write you fully as to prospects, and I therefore respectfully beg leave to call your attention, and the attention of General Bragg, to the fact that my supply of bacon is being rapidly reduced, and I have not to-day exceeding 800,000 pounds