War of the Rebellion: Serial 053 Page 0537 Chapter XIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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KNOXVILLE, August 22, 1863-3 p. m.

Brigadier General N. B. FORREST,

Kingston:

GENERAL: I am moving my infantry with a view to sustaining you at Kingston. I have just sent orders to Pegram's brigade (under Colonel Morrison) to move from the left from Winter's Gap and report to you. I must request that you will not cause it to uncover my front in that direction, but it is designed that you may employ him in any necessary military operations against the enemy. All stores not necessary for the troops should be removed from Kingston. The rafts of plank should be towed up to Loudon. Our telegraphic line is interrupted. This is sent all the way by courier. Burnside is certainly advancing, but his movements are not yet develop. Most of my infantry will camp 10 or 12 miles from here to-night in direction of Kingston.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. B. BUCKNER,

Major-General.

[HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF EAST TENNESSEE,]

Knoxville, August 22, 1863.

Brigadier General A. E. JACKSON, Jonesborough, Tenn.:

GENERAL: Burnside is evidently moving on East Tennessee in force. Rosecrans is also moving upon General Bragg. The necessity of combining with General Bragg compels me to draw most of my troops to this end of the district. The impossibility of opposing the enemy's advance at all points leads me to concentrate against his right. It is possible that he may break through some points of the mountain in your front and move upon the railroad. If upon his approach you cannot hold the positions, you will retire if practicable in the direction of Abingdon, checking his advance as far as possible. If no other recourse should be left you, you will retire in the direction of North Carolina, holding the passes as well as possible.

As a matter of precaution have the hospitals vacated and the patients sent up to the hospitals beyond Abingdon and also dispose of all surplus supplies. That you may understand fully, I will say there is no purpose of evacuating East Tennessee, but on the contrary it is proposed to defend it to the last. The measures you should take are those of precaution, which look to the possibility of the enemy's reaching the railroad, for a short time.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. B. BUCKNER,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS BUCKNER'S CORPS,

Knoxville, August 22, 1863.

Captain JONES,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Gracie's Brigade:

CAPTAIN: Stop the farther advance of the brigade on the Clinton road, and march them over to the road leading to Kingston as far as Turkey Creek.

By command of Major-General Buckner:

V. SHELIHA,

Chief of Staff.