War of the Rebellion: Serial 053 Page 0478 KY.,SW.VA.,TENN.,MISS.,N.ALA., AND N.GA. Chapter XLII.

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was given up temporarily, because we could not then safely hold it. It was isolated from us by distance and the defile of Chattanooga Creek. We could be done only when the railroad being secured, the depots replenished, and Hooker's transportation provided. Without that he cannot subsist in a suitable position.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

CHATTANOOGA, October 19, 1863-6.20 p.m.

(Received 11.50 p.m.)

ColonelE. D. TOWNSEND,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

General Orders, War Department, No. 337, by telegraph, just received. Will be executed immediately. I leave to-morrow for Stevenson.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Chattanooga, October 19, 1863.

Major General General U. S. GRANT,

Louisville, Ky.:

General Orders, No. 1, Division of the Mississippi, just received and shall be executed to-night.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND,

No. 242.

Chattanooga, Tenn., October 19, 1863.

The general commanding announces to the officers and soldiers of the Army of the Cumberland that he leaves them under orders from the President.

Major General George H. Thomas, in compliance with orders, will assume the command of this army and department. The chiefs of all the staff departments will report to him for orders.

In taking leave of you, his brothers in arms, officers and soldiers, he congratulates you that your new commander, comes to you not as he did, a stranger. General Thomas has been identified with this army from its first organization. He has led you often in battle. To his known prudence, dauntless courage, and true patriotism, you may look with confidence that under God he will lead you to victory. The general commanding doubts not you will be as true to yourselves and your country in the future as you been in the past. To the division and brigade commanders, he tenders his cordial thanks for their valuable aid and hearty co-operation in all he has undertaken. To the chiefs of staff departments and their subordinates, whom he leaves behind, he owes a debt of gratitude for their fidelity and untiring devotion do duty.

Companions in arms, officers and soldiers, farewell, and may God bless you.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.