War of the Rebellion: Serial 053 Page 0439 Chapter XLII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Chattanooga, October 17, 1863.

Major General G. H. THOMAS,

Commanding Fourteenth Army Corps:

GENERAL: The major-general commanding directs that the Eighteenth Ohio Regiment report for temporary duty to Brigadier-General Smith, chief engineer, at these headquarters, to whom its commanding officer will at once report in person for instructions.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM McMICHAEL,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Chattanooga, October 17, 1863.

Major-General THOMAS:

The major-general commanding directs you to detail from the Second Minnesota, of your command, 50 picked men, under a competent commissioned officer, to report 7 a.m. to-morrow to

Brigadier-General Smith, chief engineer, at these headquarters. The detail to be increased as the occasion may require.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. McMICHAEL,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS, INSPECTOR-GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT, Chattanooga, October 17, 1873.

[Major-General THOMAS:]

GENERAL: I have the honor to forward the following report:

I have noticed in the last few days, while making my tour of duty through the several camps in Fourteenth Army Corps, a general letting-down or slackness in the usual discipline of the corps. The usual care and attention to the cleanliness and neatness of camps, necessary to health, is very much neglected by regimental commanders. Provost-marshals are unnecessarily slack in the performance of their respective duties, as but little attention is paid to the straggling of soldiers from their commands, and the firing of arms through the camps at all hours of the day, early and late, is of very frequent occurrence.

The straggling of soldiers from camp outside the breast-works has become very great, and annoying to those on duty at the front, materially interfering with the pickets, making them careless and less watchful of their duty, and at a time when a vigilant picket is so essential to our army.

I am, general, very respectfully, you obedient servant,

J. D. BARKER,

Captain, and Actg. Asst. Inspector-General, 14th Army Corps.