War of the Rebellion: Serial 053 Page 0435 Chapter XLII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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cut his force in two, scattering a large portion of it, capturing four pieces of artillery, one thousand stand of cavalry arms, and 240 prisoners, besides the wounded. As I pushed on after the enemy immediately, I have not been able to ascertain the number of their killed and wounded, but it was very heavy. They were scattered over a distance of 15 miles from this on. Their retreat was a perfect rout, their men deserting and straggling over the country. I pressed them with great vigor, but their horses better than mine, I was only able to come up with a couple of regiments at Sugar Creek, left to detain me. I made a charge on them, capturing some 50 of them, and scattering the remainder in the mountains. When within 8 miles of the river I struck the gallop, but when I reached the river I found that they had all crossed at a ford some 3 miles above Lamb's Ferry, where they could cross 12 abreast. I never saw troops more demoralized than they were, and I am satisfied that their loss on the raid not less then 2,000. No fears need be entertained of their making another raid soon.

GEORGE CROOK,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

CHATTANOOGA, TENN., October 17, 1863-8 p.m.

(Received 11.30 p.m., 18th.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

Enemy's position as yesterday; are working on pontoons; quiet up river. Rumors that they will cross at Harrison. Have strengthened force at that point. Rumor here of a battle at Bull Run. Give us such news as you can. Roads below us terrible.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

CHATTANOOGA, TENN., October 17, 1863-6.30 p.m.

(Received 11.25 p.m., 18th.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

It was a modification of general orders to meet the exigencies of our wants for engineer troops I wanted. Has not the President power to transfer or even to muster a whole regiment or its units out of service? If so any regiment can be mustered out, and reinstated as veteran volunteers in the engineer regiment. Please have this done.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

CHATTANOOGA, October 17, 1863-7 p.m.

(Received 11.35 p.m.,18th.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

Can you let me have Lieutenant ColonelJ. H. Wilson, now on Grant's staff, for colonel of the engineer regiment? I prefer him to all others, and think, from his character and experience, the appointment will be for the best interests of the service.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Battle Creek, Tenn., October 17, 1863-9.30 a.m.

[General ROSECRANS:]

MY DEAR GENERAL: Have just arrived here. Encamped last night on the other side of the Little Sequatchie, which was too high