War of the Rebellion: Serial 053 Page 0424 KY.,SW.VA.,TENN.,MISS.,N.ALA., AND N.GA. Chapter XLII.

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not guard the crossing at Cotton Port, as it is too far away to

re-enforce in time. I suggest that a regiment or two be sent up from your force to assist me in resting the crossing by the enemy. I could not bring more than 800 or 1,000 into an engagement now, as my force is so much scattered guarding so many points.

There is another ford 20 miles from here, and about the same distance from you, which I wish you would guard.

E. S. BOND,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

[Inclosure No. 3.]

MOUTH NORTH CHICKAMAUGA, October 14, 1863.

General SPEARS:

If would be best to send that regiment to the mouth of Soddy, as directed by order of General Rosecrans, and there intrench. I have adopted a system of patrols by which I patrol the river every hour from Chattanooga up to Duncan's Ferry. I would recommend the same proceeding in your front. Beware, for I think they intend to cross in your front. Your patrols can communicate with mine at Duncan's Ferry.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

DAN'L McCOOK,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

[Inclosure No. 4.]

HEADQUARTERS SECOND CAVALRY DIVISION, Smith's Cross-Roads, October 1, 1863-11 a.m.

[General J. G. SPEARS:]

GENERAL: The general commanding directs that you move with your brigade across to Sale Creek, near Blythe's Ferry, and go into camp. All the cavalry and mounted infantry will be ordered away from those points. The train will be left to be protected by you. The general further directs that you send one regiment to Blythe's Ferry, to go into camp there, and that you will picket the river at all points necessary or doubtful, and keep a sharp lookout for the enemy and prevent a crossing. You will move at once.

By command of Brigadier-General Crook:

R. P. KENNEDY,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Chattanooga, October 16, 1863.

Brigadier-General SPEARS:

Wilder's troops must do all they can, and fight as well as work. You should not make your pickets on the road very heavy as things now are. You can dispose your troops to the best advantage for guarding the river on you front, say from Cotton Port down, using great care not to be deceived by feints at crossing. Keep your men so that you move nearly all at once to the main as soon as you discover it.