War of the Rebellion: Serial 053 Page 0394 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., N. ALA. AND N. GA.

Search Civil War Official Records

[CHAP. XLII.

HDQRS. EIGHTEENTH KENTUCKY VOLUNTEER INFANTRY,

Camp near Williams' Island, October 15, 1863.

Major WILLIAM McMICHAEL,

Asst. Adjt. General, Department of the Cumberland:

MAJOR: I have under my command at this point my own men, in number 200 for duty, and 50 picked men of the First Ohio Sharpshooters. The latter are on duty during daylight, in addition to a daily picket detail of 50 men of the Eighteenth Kentucky. As I have before reported, work on the road is suspended between this point and Big Suck Creek, for the reason that the men are exposed to the fire of the enemy's sharpshooters. The Pioneer battalion and the working parties sent out to assist them moved camp over the mountain this morning. They are not considered under my command. The late rains have swelled the mountain streams so as to render the river road impassable. A scouting party sent out to-day found it impossible to pass Little Suck Creek. Under cover of darkness it may be crossed on the unfinished bridge, which is commanded by the enemy's sharpshooters, and another party will attempt it before daylight in the morning. So soon as I can hear form it I shall forward a report in reference to the telegraph wire. The enemy has been unusually quiet to-day. The officer commanding sharpshooters reports very few in sight.

I am, very respectfully,

HUBBARD K. MILWARD,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES,

Battle Creek, Tenn., October 15, 1863.

Lieutenant-Colonel GODDARD,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Dept. Headquarters:

SIR: The continued rains are causing more or less detention to the prompt passage of trains. The roads are reported very had between Stevenson and this place. I have directed Colonel Lyon to detail the necessary pioneer force from his command to put the road in good order. The river and Battle Creek are rising rapidly; the pontoons across the latter are being well attended to. The officer in charge of working party at Sequatchie River reports that the rise in the river has seriously interrupted the work upon the bridge. A pontoon train has gone forward, and the necessary detail has been made to assist in constructing pontoon bridge. Every effort will be made to pass trains in the morning.

Very respectfully,

JAMES D. MORGAN,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ANDERSON CAVALRY,

Roberson's, October 15, 1863.

Colonel JOHN TILLSON,

Commanding Brigade:

COLONEL: I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your favor of the 13th.

I understand from it that you have five regiments of infantry