War of the Rebellion: Serial 053 Page 0370 KY., SW. VA., TENN.,MISS., N. ALA. AND N. GA.

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[CHAP. XLII.

used for like purposes. Have secured all the planks necessary for the bridge at Sequatchie River. Several trains have passed to the front to-day. River rising slowly. All quiet. Will keep you fully advised.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES D. MORGAN,

Brigadier-General.

DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS,

October 14, 1863.

General MORGAN,

Battle Creek:

Send a smart regiment to Bob White's,on mountain, to-night, to guard the river above and below that place. They must be smart and catch rebels from the other side if possible. Commander must send full report through you daily.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Chattanooga, October 14, 1863.- 6 p.m.

Brigadier-General SPEARS,

Sale Creek:

It is reported that the river above Sale Creek is not well patrolled, and that rebels are on the other side of the river and can ford. Keep a good lookout, move troops about, encamping at different places, so that their position cannot be anticipated by rebels.

By order of Major-General Rosecrans:

WM. McMICHAEL,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

ROGERSVILLE, October 14, 1863.

Brigadier-General GARFIELD:

I have arrived here with my command. The enemy succeeded in crossing the Tennessee River a short distance above Lamb's Ferry. Crook fought them at Farmington on Wednesday, the 7th, and has captured five pieces of artillery and about 700 prisoners. I think their losses, including deserters and stragglers, &c., will amount to 2,000 men. My horses badly jaded. I shall return toward Stevenson via Huntsville, but must move very slowly for my horses are so near used up. The enemy crossed the river at a found unknown before, and cut their way down to the banks, in order to make the crossing. Your order in regard to Confederate soldiers has been carried out, and 38 men have disappeared. Colonel Minty was arrested by General Crook, and sent to the rear, for failing to move with his command at the proper time and not being up in time for the fight at Farmington. We have marched in six days 247 miles. Two days, the second out and yesterday, the First Division marched 50 miles. During the last day's march Wheeler's