War of the Rebellion: Serial 053 Page 0290 KY.,SW.VA.,TENN.,MISS.,N.ALA.,AND N.GA. Chapter XLII.

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the information further is that the rebels say their intention is to cross the river in force. The river is now fordable.

This command could now forage as far up the valley and river as Washington, and still farther up for some distance.

Heavy foraging trains, said to be from Chattanooga, are foraging above this command and near to it, so that in a very few days no forage can be procured for this command without going to a considerable and inconvenient distance. Why not the foraging trains take the farthest forage first? I have sent a courier to Washington, some scouts across the river and over Sequatchie Valley. All will arrive to-night. I will dispatch to you to-morrow such information as may be received.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES G. SPEARS,

Brigadier-General, Commanding,&c.

HEADQUARTERS CHIEF OF CAVALRY, DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Limestone Creek, October 11, 1863.

Colonel E. M. McCOOK,

Commanding First Division Cavalry:

COLONEL: The general commanding directs me to say that firing in camp without authority or cause has become so common, and no attention seems to be paid to previous orders, that, hereafter, whenever a soldier is caught firing either his pistol or carbine, without permission or for a good and sufficient reason, the colonel of his regiment and the commanding officer of the company will be held accountable and immediately dismissed from the service of the United States subject to the approval of the major-general commanding the department.

I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. H. SINCLAIR,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. THIRD BRIGADE, FIRST CAVALRY DIVISION,

Caperton's Ferry, Ala., October 11, 1863.

Major FRANK S. BOND,

Aide-de-Camp:

MAJOR:In compliance with your telegram of the 11th, pertaining to the occurrences on my front, I would respectfully report that in my immediate front there has nothing been seen of an enemy for some days. The only information that could be ascertained is that Roddey's command, estimated at 1,200, passed through Larkinsville on the 8th instant, moving rapidly in the direction of Winchester. I habitually send out scouting party beyond Bellefonte.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

LOUIS D. WATKINS,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.