War of the Rebellion: Serial 053 Page 0264 KY.,SW.VA.,TENN.,MISS.,N.ALA.,AND N.GA. Chapter XLII.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Chattanooga, October 10, 1863.

Major-General HOOKER,

Stevenson:

In compliance with your wishes, the troops under General Morgan are relieved from duty on the line of the railroad, and orders have been sent to him to take post with his command at Battle Creek to guard the pontoons at that point and repair the roads thence to Jasper and beyond, his headquarters to be at Battle Creek. This order will make the detail of the regiment from your command to relieve the Thirty-fourth Illinois at Battle Creek, as ordered yesterday, unnecessary. That order is therefore revoked, and the regiment will, if it has started, be recalled.

By order of Major-General Rosecrans:

C. GODDARD,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

STEVENSON, October 10, 1863-5.30 p.m.

Brigadier-General GARFIELD:

General Morgan presented me with a telegram from department headquarters countermanding the withdrawal of his troops between here and Tantalon. I had previously ordered a brigade from the Eleventh Corps to relieve them, and the residue to take post in this vicinity. The brigade is here. I prefer those points to be held by troops with which I am acquainted. I apprehend no annoyance from raiders after my troops are once in position. This has been delayed by the non-arrival of a portion of the Twelfth Corps, and among them an unusual portion of general officers.

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Chattanooga, October 10, 1863.

Major-General HOOKER,

Stevenson, Ala.:

Have you further information form our cavalry? Do you think the enemy's cavalry passed from the tunnel over toward the Sequatchie? Give all the information you have.

W. S. ROSECRANS.

STEVENSON, October 10, 1863-8 p.m.

Brigadier-General GARFIELD:

General Butterfield just in. He reports that Sherman, a railroad man, and a prisoner of Wheeler's for two days, reports that the rebel cavalry which crossed the river above numbered about 8,000, and that while with the rebel forces he heard the officers state that they regarded the position of the army at Chattanooga as impregnable; that they were afraid to attack it, and resolved to starve it out by cutting the communications from Chattanooga to Louisville, and