War of the Rebellion: Serial 053 Page 0240 KY.,SW.VA.,TENN.,MISS.,N.ALA.,AND N.GA. Chapter XLII.

Search Civil War Official Records

to Ripley to co-operate with me we might succeed in inflicting serious injury upon the enemy, as that will be one of their principal lines of retreat.

T. W. SWEENY,

Brigadier-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. SIXTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

No. 217. Memphis, Tenn., October 10, 1863.

* * * * * * *

II. In pursuance of instructions this day received from the major-general commanding department, Brig. General Hugh T. Reid, U. S. Volunteers, will, without delay, proceed to Cairo, Ill., and assume command of that post.

Brig. General H. T. Reid having arrived at Cairo, Ill., will report by letter to Brig. General Andrew J. Smith, commanding Sixth Division.

* * * * * * *

By order of Major General S. A. Hurlbut:

HENRY BINMORE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

ON BOARD STEAMER SOUTH WESTER, October 10, 1863.

In compliance with General Orders, No. 276, from the War Department, I have the honor to report that on the 5th instant I assumed command on board Government transport steamer South Wester, W. H. Blake master, bound from Vicksburg, Miss., to Memphis, Tenn. The trip was made in four and a half days, with great difficulty in obtaining fuel. Having no coal and the wood being so green the boat could not make sufficient steam. The passengers on board consisted of citizens, officers, and soldiers, all orderly and well disposed. There were no arms in the hands of the soldiers, who were mostly furloughed men joining their regiments in General Sherman' corps, and now in Tennessee. When within 5 or 6 miles of Helena, Ark., the boat was fired into by guerrillas on the Mississippi shore. Robert T. Wilson, sutler of the Seventeenth Illinois Infantry Volunteers, was shot through the head and killed on the 9th instant. The guerrillas shot 2 rounds and some scattering shots. They were variously estimated at from 30 to 40 in number. On the trip up Alexander J. Ballentine, of the Twenty-third Iowa Infantry Volunteers, died of chronic diarrhea. Great care was manifested and taken in guarding and watching against accident and fire, night and day, both by the military-officers and soldiers-and the officers and crew of the boat. The officers and soldiers were formed into three reliefs, commanded by officer of the day and two lieutenants of the guard.

Very respectfully,

A. L. WALLAR,

Captain Company F, 78th Ohio Volunteers Infantry, Comdg.

P. S.-Since arriving at the port of Memphis it is discovered that L. M. Hall, civilian, a passenger on board, is missing, and has not been seen by any person on board since the guerrillas fired into the boat.

A. L. W.