War of the Rebellion: Serial 053 Page 0219 Chapter XLII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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ANDERSON, October 9, 1863.

Brigadier-General MORGAN:

I heard a message about 8 o'clock sent from Cowan to some commander north of him saying that the enemy had driven in our pickets at the tunnel. Half an hour later our line parted north; not in order yet. Lieutenant of scouts that you sent out this morning is here on way to Stevenson. Have you further orders for him?

ATWATER,

Operator.

STEVENSON, October 9, 1863-11 a.m.

Lieutenant-Colonel GODDARD,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Order to concentrate my command at Anderson's Cross-Roads just received. The Thirty-fourth Illinois Infantry, General Johnson's division, is stationed at Battle Creek for protection of pontoon bridge; no troops of my command there. Will leave here early in the morning.

JAMES D. MORGAN,

Brigadier-General.

HDQRS. FIRST BRIG., SECOND DIV., RESERVE CORPS,

Bridgeport, Ala., October 9, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel C. GODDARD,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Dept. of the Cumberland:

I have the honor to report that on or about the 24th of July, 1863, the Confederate forces wounded and took prisoner on Cumberland Mountains, near University Meeting-House, Dixon Chitty, a loyal citizen, who was endeavoring to escape to our lines, and now hold him wounded and in close confinement at Atlanta, Ga.

On the 8th instant Captain C. H. Richman, brigade inspector of this command, while on a scout, captured a number of prisoners, among them 2 citizens, known to be disloyal, by the names of Davis Harris and James H. Bell, living on Raccoon Mountain. I would respectfully ask that they be held as hostages for the safe and prompt return through our lines of said Chitty.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. F. SMITH,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES,

Anderson's Cross-Roads, Tenn., October 9, 1863.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL,

Department of the Cumberland, Chattanooga, Tenn.:

I have my command intrenched in position to protect the junction of roads and also aid trains up the mountain. On my arrival I detailed an officer whose especial duty should be clearing the road of obstructions and expediting the trains; in this he has been well assisted by the Twenty-first Kentucky Infantry. The road up the mountain is better than before the raid, and no detentions occur.