War of the Rebellion: Serial 053 Page 0181 Chapter XLII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Chattanooga, October 8, 1863.

Major-General THOMAS,

Commanding Fourteenth Army Corps:

GENERAL: Your not proposing to send a forage train, escorted by a brigade of infantry as escort, is received. The general commanding approves you proposal, and directs you to cross your brigade in the night-to-morrow night. A circular, in accordance with your suggestion, has been issued in regard to ammunition-wagons.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. A. GARFIELD,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff.

LOOKOUT STATION NEAR GENERAL THOMAS' HDQRS.

October 8, 1863.,

Captain WILLIAM A. SEITER,

Chief Signal Officer, Fourteenth Army Corps:

In looking along the enemy's line I noticed they have removed some of their camps immediately in front of what we call General Bragg's headquarters. They must have been taken up last night. The tents at the signal station on the enemy's right also are gone.

WM. QUINTON,

Lieutenant and Acting Signal Officer.

The following was read from rebel lookout this a..m.:

Notice pontoon bridge over Tennessee is completed; wagons and cavalry crossing.

D.

WM. QUINTON,

Lieutenant and Acting Signal Officer.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Provost-Marshal's Officer, October 8, 1863.

Captain B. H. POLK,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Fourteenth Army Corps:

CAPTAIN: G. H. Baughn, sergeant Company F, Fifth Kentucky Volunteers, Preston's brigade (Kelly's), Preston's division, Buckner's corps, with 6 privates deserted and came into the lines of the Third Division of the Fourteenth Army Corps last night; they are all of the same regiment. Sergeant Baughn reports that there is a general feeling of dissatisfaction among the troops of the rebel army; that he has frequently seen squads of men discussing the question; that on the march from Knoxville 80 men deserted from the Sixty-third Tennessee in one night, and that over 100 have deserted from the Fifty-eighth North Carolina since the regiment left Loudon; that it was rumored in camp on Monday last that an effort was made to get the Georgia State troops to the front, but that they refused to cross the State line; that he heard firing in their rear, and several pieces of artillery and a number of troops were sent to the rear in great haste. The Georgia State troops have not yet crossed the line.

That the engineers and pioneers are at work building pontoons; that they are baking up a large quantity of bread and putting it in barrels and loading into wagons,and it is rumored that the rebel army is preparing for a march shortly.