War of the Rebellion: Serial 053 Page 0161 Chapter XLII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION

Search Civil War Official Records

three pieces of artillery. The rebel force is large, and our force is adequate to their pursuit and, I hope destruction. The general opinion of those acquainted with the country is that our cavalry force will capture or destroy them. General Ruger's brigade has continued on to Bell Buckle on the railroad, where Knipe's brigade will now march and headquarters be to-night.

I expect to find the Michigan Engineers hard at work at Wartrace bridge,and shall push all energy to opening the road. I have returned a portion of the infantry to Duck River,and shall return the One hundred and second Ohio, of Granger's command to Tullahoma or Decherd. I learn that bridges this side of Murfreesborough have been destroyed and much injury done; that our forces are working this way from there. Shall keep on to meet them, and see the telegraph and railroad opened.

DANL. BUTTERFIELD,

Major-General.

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major-General.

DUCK RIVER, October 7, 1863.

Major-General HOOKER:

It is now nearly 6 a.m. and my trains are not up. My plans for an early attack are frustrated.

DANL. BUTTERFIELD,

Major-General.

STEVENSON, October 7, 1863-8 a.m.

Major-General BUTTERFIELD:

If your trains disappoint you, ascertain where the fault lies, and the remedy shall be applied at once. Please ascertain also why some of the troops of the Twelfth Corps were not left at Wartrace, and also why no movement was made from Decherd to relieve the troops at that point and Duck River when directed to do so. Which of the Generals Granger ordered the abandonment of Wartrace? It seems to me that there has been bad conduct enough on that part of the road to dishonor a brave army.

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major-General, Commanding.

STEVENSON, October 7, 1863-2 p.m

Major-General BUTTERFIELD:

The statement of the chief of scouts at Wartrace is os improbable that it will not do to base action upon it without further evidence. That scout should be instructed to go and look into Matt's Hollow to-night, and report what he can see and hear. Even if the report should be true, the best way to operate against that force will be to open our communication with the rear.

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major-General, Commanding.

DUCK RIVER,

October 7, 1863-8.15 a.m.

Major-General HOOKER:

My column now starts for Shelbyville from here-Fifth Iowa Cavalry and two of Geary's regiments. The main column will start

11 R R-VOL XXX, PT IV