War of the Rebellion: Serial 053 Page 0108 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., N. ALA., AND N. GA. Chapter XLII.

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HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, TWENTY-FIRST CORPS,

Chattanooga, October 5, 1863.

Captain P. P. OLDERSHAW,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Twenty-first Corps:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to state, for the information of the general commanding, that the difference between the report of effective force of this command on the 28th ultimo and the 4th instant is occasioned by the absence of the Twenty-first Kentucky Volunteers. The effective force of this regiment was included in the report of the 28th ultimo, but shortly afterward it was detached and sent into the Sequatchie Valley to guard trains over the mountain, and it was not included in the return of yesterday.

Very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

H. P. VAN CLEVE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.

HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, TWENTY-FIRST CORPS,

October 5, 1863.

Captain E. A. OTIS,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

SIR: I have the honor to report all quiet in our front up to the present writing. Our pickets have exchanged papers, but have not laid down their arms, or met the rebels in any considerable number for purposes of conversation, &c. as I hear has been done in other parts of the line. The rebel pickets who do come up to our line say that some of them would willingly desert to us if they were assured they would be paroled or not held as prisoners. The orders of General Rosecrans in regard to non-intercourse of our men and rebel pickets, and proper exchanges of papers under the direction of commanding officers will be strictly enforced in this division.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. T. SWAINE,

Colonel 99th Ohio Vol. Infantry, Comdg. Advance Forces.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST BRIGADE, FIRST DIVISION,

October 5, 1863.

Major J. S. FULLERTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

The firing across the ridge called Missionary Ridge was quite heavy. Cannonading between 2 and 4 o'clock, distinct and heavy. We at the batteries on the hill thought that there was an effort to cover it up by firing their own guns here, but that there was firing there is no doubt. We could see smoke over the ridge, and as late as 5 o'clock there was scattered firing. We did not and do not know what it means.

Respectfully,

W. C. WHITAKER,

Brigadier-General.