War of the Rebellion: Serial 053 Page 0107 Chapter XLII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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Ridge this morning, and marched to the enemy's left. Two pieces of artillery opened fire on the hill in your immediate front about 11 a.m. firing at intervals during the day, but without effect. The heavy firing was on the right of our forces. The enemy has not exposed as much force in your to-day as usual.

I am, sir, respectfully,

J. L. YARYAN,

Aide-de-Camp.

FORT DUNLAP, October 5, 1863.

Brigadier-General WOOD,

Comdg. First Division, Twenty-first Army Corps:

GENERAL: There was a change in position of camp-fires last night. The fires on the extreme right of the enemy and opposite to the front of Third Brigade of General Van Cleve's division were more clearly defined. About a brigade of the enemy have been maneuvering on the crest of the ridge about unpainted house this morning.

Respectfully,

LUTHER M. DE MOTTE,

Lieutenant and Acting Signal Officer.

FORT DUNLAP, October 5, 1863.

Brigadier-General WOOD,

Commanding First Division:

GENERAL: During the cannonading to-day the enemy had a large body of troops on the crest of the ridge. They were in column by company, and stacked arms in that position. At what we term Bragg's headquarters there were a large number of troops. At a slightly elevated point northeast of this fort, about midway the side of the ridge, and nearly opposite Third Brigade of Van Cleve's division, I saw a party at work. I think they have some fortifications already at that point, and are enlarging them. The working party did not appear a large one, but was concealed greatly by the timber, so I could not fairly estimate its size. The camp-fires present their usual appearance. There are three lines of earth-works on Lookout Mountain.

Respectfully,

LUTHER M. DE MOTTE,

Lieutenant and Acting Signal Officer

CIRCULAR.] HDQRS. SECOND DIVISION, 21ST ARMY CORPS,

Chattanooga, October 5, 1863.

Brigade commanders will see that their commands stand at arms, at the usual time before daylight, and that at least one-half of their men are under arms until broad daylight and the disappearance of the fog; one-half of the command may be allowed to cook at a time. The officers of the picket will be unusually vigilant, and report every sign of a movement on the part of the enemy.

By command of Major-General Palmer:

D. W. NORTON,

Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.