War of the Rebellion: Serial 053 Page 0102 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., N. ALA., AND N. GA. Chapter XLII.

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hours' practice. The large gun on Mission Ridge fires a conical shell of about 6 inches diameter. The base of one was picked up and carried to headquarters.

The negro boys about the camps continued their games of marbles, and the men stood upon the parapets and glacis of the intrenchments, watching the shots and speculating upon their effect. The men are indifferent to distant artillery fire, and expose themselves. Some severe casualties will, if this shelling continues, result from this practice. The rebels did not show themselves much.

The pontoon bridge will, I think, be completed early to-morrow. The rise in the river, which steadily increases, has rendered the other two bridges impassable. A ferry rope and flat-boat, and a steam-boat (the Paint Rock) captured and repaired, affords the means of crossing at present. The river is about 1,000 feet wide, and is now deep enough for navigation at this point. The rebel guns on Lookout Mountain, however, command the channel at its base.

M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General.

CHATTANOOGA, TENN., October 5, 1863

(Via Bridgeport, Ala. Received 12.12 a.m., 9th.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK:

The large amount of pioneer work which is constantly necessary in this army, building bridges, making and repairing roads, &c., is entirely beyond the capacity of the force at our disposal. I would therefore strongly urge that a portion of the engineer troops of the Regular Army be ordered to this department.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Chattanooga, October 5, 1863.

Colonel HODGES,

Nashville:

Estimated destruction by Wheeler, 350 wagons. If reports are true, strays and recaptures by McCook will give us back over 1,000 mules. I have ordered on the transportation of the Eleventh and Twelfth Corps, and Major-General Halleck telegraphs it will be sent immediately. I think each corps had about 300 or 400 wagons. These will supply, and more than supply, losses if they arrive safely.

The rebel cavalry is on our communication, ours pursuing.

M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Chattanooga, October 5, 1863-1 p.m.

(Received 11.25 p.m., 8th.)

Brigadier General D. H. RUCKER:

Advise me by telegraph of the number of wagons and animals of the trains of the Eleventh and Twelfth Corps, and the probable time